Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01

Have you seen that episode of Parks and Recreation where ? That’s how I typically feel when I’m around wine enthusiasts and professionals — like I’m swirling grape juice around in a fancy glass that I’m possibly holding upside down and declaring I smell notes of sandwich and the color purple.

So the wasn’t exactly the most natural fit for me — I’m no wine aficionado. But I do have an affection for all things quirky and corked, having enjoyed tastings at wineries  in the rural outskirts of Cambodia, in the shadow of a volcano in Hawaii, and in a town predominantly known for brothels in Nevada. The fact that the harsh, inhospitable growing environment on Santorini isn’t one of the world’s famous wine regions is exactly what piqued my interest.

And so when our guide, a salt-and-pepper-haired Greek sommelier named Stamatis picked us up in the morning, I already knew we were in for an interesting day.

Santorini Wine Tour

Santorini Wine Tour

Heather and had I debated about whether or not to do the Akrotori add-on to the winery tour.  Looking back, I can’t believe we hesitated — it was one of the highlights of Santorini for me.

Akrotiri was once a that lay buried for centuries after a volcanic explosion. The almost 4,000 year old ruins are now one of the Aegean’s most important prehistoric settlements. Yet, to be honest, I think had we strolled through on our own, we would have been there for about fifteen minutes, scanned a few plaques, taken a few obligatory photos, and left with a shrug. However, thanks to our private guide Malissos, who Stamatis handed us off to at the gate, we spent over an hour enraptured by the story of this amazing ancient civilization, rumored by some to be the lost city of Atlantis.

Malissos was hands down the most engaging guide I’ve ever had at a historical site, patiently answering our endless questions and picking up on the aspects of the history we were most interested in and focusing on those.

Akrotiri, Santorini, Greece

Akrotiri, Santorini, Greece

The most haunting thing about Akrotiri? There are no bodies, no human remains, not even the bones of a single domesticated animal. This along with other clues tells archaeologists that unlike the famous tragedy at Pompeii, the people of Akrotori had warning that an eruption was coming, probably in the form of foreshocks. As wealthy seafarers, they had the means to flee, taking all their worldly treasures with them. Why they never returned, and where they went, is still a mystery.

The people of Akrotiri had a short but good life, estimated to be only about thirty-five years long, on average. The ruins of the city reveal a peaceful people and a democracy — remains of a parliament, no signs of a palace, and — Malissos pointed out with proper gravity — ubiquitous plumbing, not just reserved for an aristocracy. Toilets all around!

Unlike in much of the ancient world, the art in Akrotiri showed no signs of war, fear, or human sacrifice. Instead, archeologists have uncovered frescoes and other images of flowers, birds, dolphins, and the bounty of the sea. And wine. These ancient Minoans made wine.

Akrotiri, Santorini, Greece

Akrotiri, Santorini, Greece

When it was time to say our goodbyes we made our way to meet Stamatis at our prearranged time and location. When he wasn’t there, we tried to sit back and be patient, but our confusion and the unrelenting heat made it hard to relax. By the time we saw the van rounding the corner, we had spent an hour waiting in total between the delay in our morning pickup and now this one. We accepted Stamatis’s apologies and explanations of traffic due to the many cruise ships in port and put on smiles to meet our fellow wine tasters, who were just joining the tour — a honeymooning couple from San Francisco, two stylish sisters from Chicago (one of whom was a professional wine buyer!), and a man from the Czech Republic.

We were ready for a drink. Our first stop was Boutari Winery, the second largest in Santorini. We started our tour by wandering out to the vineyards themselves, which in Santorini look unlike the vines I’ve seen anywhere else in the world — like scrubby bushes hugging the ground. Stamatis told us a fantastic story from his time researching Santorini wines. He asked an elderly vintner, “Why do the vines grow like this in Santorini?” She responded with a shrug.

Because we found them like that.

In reality, the vines distinctive growing pattern in baskets close to the ground, rather than high on trellises, allows them access to desperately-needed moisture from the island’s notoriously volcanic dry soil. And that’s not the only way in which Santorini wines are peculiar. These vineyards have a notoriously low yield, with eight to ten kilos of grapes producing a mere 500ml of wine!

Boutari Winery, Santorini

Greek Wine

Greek Wine

Boutari Winery, SantoriniSantorini vineyards!

After touring the wine cellar, we sat down for the fun part — trying the wine. This is when I realized that this tour was more of a sommelier class than a tasting, as Stamatis explained the process and steps of wine judging, polled us on our opinions, and gave us suggestions on pairing the wines with the platters of local cheeses, breads, and meats in front of us.

The best part? There wasn’t a hint of pretention despite the fact that there was not one but two wine professionals at our table. After asking our thoughts on the wine, we’d often reply in the form of a question. I think I taste hints of nutmeg? I think I prefer the Nykteri? Stamatis wouldn’t give us the approval we were seeking on our opinions, only replying with a laugh that, “there is no argument to taste!”

Boutari Winery, Santorini

Boutari Winery, Santorini

Wine Tour Greecephoto courtesy of

Wine Tour Greecephoto courtesy of 

Boutari Winery, Santorini

Boutari Winery, Santorini

Five wines later, the late pickup fiasco was all but forgotten. But not by our ultra-polite guide. As we rose to leave Boutari, he asked us to wait a moment and returned with four bottles of fine Vinsanto, an apology to each of us for the delays at the beginning of the tour. Now that is some good damage control.

(Airlines, are you listening? I would gladly accept a bottle of fine wine in exchange for every hour you’ve ever kept me waiting in an airport or on a runway. Let’s get this implemented planet wide, am I right?!)

Boutari Winery, Santorini

Funny Winery Sign

Spirits high, our next stop was Gavalas Vineyard, which has been in the same Santorini family for more than 300 years. This was the most traditional of all the wineries we visited, with the barrels to back it up — the oldest dated back to 1863! They also maintained a traditional foot-stomping grape press, which we all took a tipsy turn goofing around in.

Again we sampled the winery’s finest offerings of traditional Santorini varietals — Assyrtiko, Nykteri and Vinsanto.

Santorini Winery Tour

Santorini Winery Tour

Santorini Winery Tour

Santorini Winery Tour

And now, I know what you’re thinking — Heather and I totally coordinated on purpose. But we didn’t, I swear. I mean, Heather didn’t anyway. She can’t help that I secretly wait to see what she’s wearing every morning so we can be twinsies!

Santorini Winery Tour

Next up was a bonus stop — Stamatis asked is we wanted to make a quick detour to Santorini’s sole microbrewery, and we readily accepted. While I’m not a beer drinker myself, I had seen the Yellow Donkey logo around town and was curious to see the brewery behind the brand.

We did a quick mini-tasting here and despite my protests I ended up with a beer in my hand at one point and greatly amused the group with my attempts to make a polite face when I tasted it.

Yellow Donkey Brewery Santorini

Yellow Donkey Brewery Santorini

Yellow Donkey Brewery SantoriniHow things have changed!

Our final stop for the day, Gaia Wines, was in fierce competition with Boutari for my favorite, if for no other reason than its stunning seaside location. Literally everything tastes better with the breeze of the Aegean whipping by.

Gaia Winery Santoriniphotos courtesy of 

Gaia Winery Santorini

Gaia Winery Santorini

Gaia Winery Santorini

And for the twelfth and final time that day, we clicked our glasses and called out a hearty cry of “Yiamas!” — cheers, in Greek.

Yet we were toasting to how amazing this tour was for long after the buzz wore off. From the fascinating Akrotiri to the fabulous wineries to our incredibly knowledgeable guides to the unbelievable customer service when something went wrong, I tip my hat — or my glass, rather — to . In fact, I’d say it competes with the Brussels Chocolate Tour for my favorite Viator experience of all time (and yes, feel free to not point out that both of those tours involve consuming calories).

Yiamas indeed! Would you trade beach time for a Santorini wine tour?

. . . . . . .

This post was brought to you by the iPhone video editing app . I am a member of the Viator Ambassador initiative and participated in this tour as part of that program.

3-devide-lines
YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY
38 Comments...
  • Emily from Let's Roam Wild
    October 24 2014

    What a treasure! I’ve only done a wine tour in Mendoza, Argentina (which was fabulous), but this one looks absolutely fabulous. Good for you for trying the beer πŸ™‚ – microbreweries are just as fun to visit. I know Viator sponsors these tours, but it’d be great to know at the end of these how much they would typically cost, for planning purposes.
    Emily from Let’s Roam Wild recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Hey Emily! Since tour costs so often fluctuate with time and season and my archives are always open, I’ve mostly stopped including them in posts as it makes obsolete quite quickly. You can always find the price super easily by clicking the various links to the tour — it’s even above the fold on Viator πŸ™‚

  • Emily
    October 24 2014

    That sounds like a delightful tour (I love wine tastings!) and it’s nice that they actually care about service and provided a bottle as an apology!
    Emily recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      We were really wowed by that! I think good customer service is such a treasure… and too rare these days!

  • Ashley
    October 24 2014

    I love wine tours, and would definitely try this tour since I’m quite ignorant of Greek wine. The vineyards are so strange looking!
    Ashley recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      I know! We couldn’t actually believe the little bushes we’d been seeing everywhere were wine!

  • Miquel
    October 24 2014

    Ok I’m turning green with envy now. You had me laughing out loud throughout the beginning of this post. I can completely relate. I worked for some time at La Cave in the The Wynn in Vegas and it was part of my job to learn about wine and be surrounded by pretentious Sommeliers. I once heard a wine described as “spicy sex box”…… really? I would definitely trade beach time for a wine tour. Greece + Wine = my kinda vacation
    Miquel recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Ha ha, I would have a really hard time keeping a straight face in that situation! I’m impressed you did it! And by they way, I’m sure you have some GREAT stories to tell from working in Vegas…

  • Sonja at Breadcrumbs Guide
    October 24 2014

    Ha! I can totally relate to this. Garren and I tried to “fake it” around Bordeaux, France but they saw right through us! We really just wanted the tasting! I need to go on a wine tour made for people who appreciate wine but know next to nothing about it!
    Sonja at Breadcrumbs Guide recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      I think this would be a good description of that πŸ™‚ We were at all levels on this tour (me being at the two buck chuck side of the spectrum) and everyone had a really good time!

  • becky hutner
    October 24 2014

    I am seriously so touched that the ancient Akrotirians (totally what they’re called right?) were peaceful folk! I feel like most historical tours are usually full of wars and strife.

    PS — the donkey logos are so cute!

    PPS — i LOVE heather’s red door shot w/ the streaky light.
    becky hutner recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Agreed, to all three points! I seriously can’t emphasize how much we loved Akritori, and how I would have missed it all had we not had a guide. I’m definitely going to remember that next time I rock up at a historical site and try to decide whether or not it’s in the budget.

  • Shaun's Cracked Compass
    October 24 2014

    Who knew they had so many whiners on that little island πŸ™‚ And you got my vote on the wine vs waiting debate.

    I think the Aegean is the poet of the seas. Every morning in Milos I would wake up to the sound of it’s waves and would be overwhelmed with zen.
    Shaun’s Cracked Compass recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      That is a beautiful description. And I couldn’t agree more. I need more Aegean in my life.

  • Tim
    October 24 2014

    Sad story about the lost civilization at Akrotiri … as least their life wasn’t nasty, and brutish, even if it was short!

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Well, I like to think they went on to lead happy lives… just somewhere else we don’t know about yet! πŸ™‚

  • Anna
    October 24 2014

    Spending all day drinking wine in the sunshine… sounds like the perfect tour to me too! I’ve gone on a few winery tours but this one definitely has all of them beat. Jealous!
    Anna recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Yeah, it will be really hard to top this one, I think. But I won’t let that stop me from trying… πŸ™‚

  • Joella in Beijing
    October 24 2014

    I would definitely give up a bit of beach time for this wine tour- sounds great. I’ve never done a tour like this but I have visited a couple of vineyards in some random places ( the Isle of Wight and Myanmar..! The one in Myanmar was especially lovely!) and I’d like to visit more. Don’t know that much about wine but I like to drink it! The story about the ancient city and people was so interesting too- I am fascinated by stuff like that and definitely going to research more myself now ha!
    Joella in Beijing recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Okay, I need to hit up this Myanmar winery when I finally get there! That sounds like my speed!

  • Justine
    October 25 2014

    This tour sounds fantastic. Although I must say I’m probably more interested in the first leg of the tour. I kind of have a thing for learning about the mysteries of ancient civilizations. I’d never heard of Akrotiri before this, but it sounds like it was a total utopia! It’s pretty odd to find an ancient civilization that depicted flowers and dolphins in their artwork, as opposed to war and violence. If I ever get the chance to do this wine tasting tour I’m definitely tacking on the tour of Akrotiri!
    Justine recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      It was definitely a refreshing story to hear! The first time I visited Santorini Akrotiri was closed for renovations… I’m so glad it was back open for business this trip.

  • Camels & Chocolate
    October 25 2014

    Ha, I feel the EXACT same way even after years of writing about wine in California! Or should I say “faking my way through writing about wine…” πŸ˜‰
    Camels & Chocolate recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      Please tell me you are a Parks and Recreation fan πŸ™‚ LIKE WE NEED SOMETHING ELSE TO BOND OVER.

  • Chris
    October 25 2014

    Like yourself, that Heather is a talent with camera in hand!

    Love the little intro with such amazing history!
    Chris recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 26 2014

      I was taking such furious notes the whole tour, it was fun to finally write it out πŸ™‚ Amazing story, isn’t it!

  • Racheal Morgan
    October 26 2014

    I love your responce to the wine tasting- one of my favorite things about your blog is that you are not snobbish at all. Especially the picture of you up there with wine tasting guidlines is totally great! Anyway, the way you present it is better than beach time by far! I would totally do a trade.
    Racheal Morgan recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 28 2014

      Ha, that is actually my friend Heather in that photo πŸ™‚ But I really appreciate your kind words about my blog — not snobbish is definitely what I’m going for πŸ™‚

  • MissLilly
    October 26 2014

    Seems like the perfect plan, a good wine in an amazing location! Great photos too
    MissLilly recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 28 2014

      Thanks! It’s easy to be creatively inspired with a setting like this.

  • Nika
    October 26 2014

    Slovenia has great vines, but this sounds awesome too! Have to try it next time when i’ll go to Greece! πŸ™‚

    • Meihoukai
      October 28 2014

      I haven’t heard much about Slovenian wines… which probably means I’d love the tour πŸ™‚

  • I had heard that Santorini is one of the places that Atlantis supposedly existed but I hadn’t heard of Akrotiri. I love ruins so I will definitely be visiting next time I am in Santorini πŸ™‚
    Katie @ The World on my Necklace recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 28 2014

      Yup, Akrotiri is where they’re referring to when they mention Atlantis and Santorini together πŸ™‚ Definitely well worth a visit!

  • Marni
    October 27 2014

    This seems like such an amazing wine tour!! I’ve only done one (a small wine tasting in Frankenmuth, MI, but since it paired wines with complimentary chocolates, it was one of my favorite things about the trip!) but I really enjoyed it. I can only imagine how much fun this would be. Plus, as a lover of history, Akrotiri sounds like a place I need to add to my bucket list!

    • Meihoukai
      October 28 2014

      Mmmm, I definitely wouldn’t turn down a chocolate pairing course πŸ™‚ Sounds like heaven!

  • Joanna
    August 8 2016

    Great post! Do you know if there are any promo codes through viator for booking this tour?
    Thanks!

    • Meihoukai
      August 10 2016

      Unfortunately I don’t have one — I have asked many times πŸ™‚ I do think it’s worth every euro though.