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I can count on my fingers the number of plastic water bottles I’ve purchased in the past two years.

And no, that’s not because I survive exclusively on Diet Coke, have developed an advanced set of minimart shoplifting techniques, or (now I’m getting really crazy) stick solely to regions of the world with clean tap water. It’s because when I’m in the US or other areas with healthy H20, I drink straight from the tap. And when I’m on the go, I use portable water filtration and purification systems.

Just in time for the holidays, I’m going to share why I believe this is the greatest gift you could ever buy yourself or another traveler in your life.

Clearly Filtered V Steripensounds fancy — actually simple

Why

Most of my favorite places to travel are simply not tap-fill friendly — and 80% of travel-related illnesses are caused by contaminated drinking water. Anyone who’s ever been on a high school student exchange and sat through four pre-trip briefings extolling the horrors of not brushing your teeth with bottled Fiji Water* knows that in much of the world, it’s simply not safe to drink straight from the tap, even if the locals are doing it (after all, they’ve had plenty of time to adapt to local bacteria). But buying water in single-use bottles is not the only option — and it’s far from the best one.

I am just not about that landfill life, guys. You simply cannot be an environmentally-friendly traveler and toss multiple plastic water bottles per day into a landfill where they’ll sit for long after we’ve left the planet (and just try to find a recycling bin in a remote corner of Peru). Even if you’re lucky enough to find a recycling facility in the Philippines, you can’t un-use the  of non-renewable energy resources that went into producing and shipping that single-use bottle in the first place.

Philippines Travelworth protecting

But let’s say you are basically just like a straight up real-life version of the evil loggers from  and you do not GAF about recycling or renewable energy or any of these other socialist concepts invented by Al Gore. I can work with this too, because there’s a big ‘ol incentive to using portable water purification that almost no one can look away from: it saves you cash in your travel budget to spend on way more exciting stuff.

An example: Thailand is hailed by travelers as being one of the cheapest countries in the world. Yet buying by the half liter bottle as most travelers do, 100 gallons of water costs $210 USD — in a country where bottled water costs about a third to a sixth of what it costs in the US. Using the standard recommendation of 8 cups or 2 liters of water per day, we’re talking around $420 a year in water alone in a country where that amount buys me a month’s rent in a luxury apartment (including all bills and a weekly cleaner). Say what?!

For that same hundred gallons, you could pay for a $24.99 filter refill. Let’s dig into that…

*Sidenote, since I brought it up and do get this question quite often: I brush my teeth with straight tap water in every corner of the world. Even Costa Rica, so take that Miss Kats! Never have I ever used bottled or filtered water to clean my teeth. No particular reason for this other than I’m lazy, I’m pretty relaxed about this kind of thing, and I had my middle name legally changed to Danger in the 8th grade so I’ve got to live up to the billing. All that said, you can use either of these methods to filter clean water to clean your teeth with, too.

Elbow Beach Bermudaeverybody loves water, no?

What

Over the past two years, I have tried and tested two different systems: the UV-light powered SteriPen, and a self-filtering Clearly Filtered bottle. I have used both these methods extensively across Southeast Asia, Central America and South America and I have not died from a water-borne illness even once. In fact, I feel fantastic (and, since I started my December goal of drinking 10 cups or 2.5L per day of water, I also feel extremely hydrated.)

The portable water purification market is a little confusing, and it might seem like there are several options available, especially when it comes to self-filtering bottles. But they all have pros and cons and varying levels of protection, and if you’re planning to travel through much of the developing world, it’s essential to find one that filters for viruses and not just particles (ie. not a Brita filter).

Once you find the right system, you’ll reach a certain level of travel nirvana — no more dedicating a chunk of your budget to simply staying hydrated, no more waking up hungover and trudging miserably to the minimart in search of safe h20 (I mean, um, going to yoga, mom), no more rising landfill guilt. Clean, safe drinking water will be right at your fingertips anywhere there’s a tap or stream.

Big Island Waterfall

About SteriPen

The SteriPen was the first portable purification system I ever tried. I asked for it for Christmas two years ago, and it’s been around the world and back several times since then. It’s a fairly straightforward system: take the cap off the UV wand, and insert it into a cup or bottle of typically un-drinkabletap water. After 90 seconds of agitation, water everywhere from Nicaragua to Nigeria is safe to drink! The UV light purifies water without yucky chemicals and without changing the taste, odor or color of the water (which can actually be a bad thing — see below). Obviously, you’ll need to pack a separate reusable water container of some kind. For me this wasn’t a big deal as I use them stateside and had several already.

The SteriPen has many makes and models to fit various needs. The new version of the one I carry, the travel version, is a convenient size and weight and has a USB rechargeable battery (making my complaint about having to find replacement batteries null). And the UV lamp lasts for 8,000 treatments, or about seven years — if you reach that, the company will replace it free of charge.

Buy here: 
Cost: $99 (but on crazy sale with Amazon right now for $59!)
Weight: 2.6oz
Lifespan: Sterilizes 40 half liters of water on one charge

Steripen Traveler Review

Pros to Steripen

• You can sterilize water in any container — and add to it. Want to stir in an electrolyte pack? No problem. Want to squeeze some lemons into your water? Go right ahead! This is a big bonus over the majority of self-filtering bottles on the market.

• The SteriPen can be easily shared by multiple travelers. Make sure everyone has their own reuseable bottle, and pass the pen around every time you collectively refill. Great for families.

Cons to SteriPen

• The SteriPen purifies but does not filter. So while it’s effective against viruses, bacteria, portozoa, and all other kinds of nasty invisible stuff, you can’t use it with cloudy or dirty water as there’s no way to filter the particles. Also, it won’t improve taste. You could combine it with a super cheap carbon filter bottle (like the Camelback Groove or a Brita bottle) to negate this issue.

• While I think the rechargeable battery move was a brilliant one, it’s still kind of pain to have one more thing that constantly needs to be plugged in.

• Honestly, it can be a bit of a pain. While I was a gung-ho user at first, over time I grew impatient over having to fill up, uncap, and sit there stirring before I could take a gulp.

Steripen Traveler Review

About Clearly Filtered

Simply fill the bottle from the tap and immediately start to drink — that’s the magic of the self filtering Clearly Filtered bottle. Water will be sucked through the filter on demand, and what comes out of the straw is clean and clear.

Clearly Filtered removes all the bad stuff — bacteria, metals, viruses, parasites — and is far superior to its competitors (with a longer lasting filter, and more thorough filration) at Camelbak, Brita, etc. Speaking of the filter: it doesn’t require cleaning, and flow will be restricted when it’s time for a replacement, so you never have to wonder. It needs swapping out every 100 gallons (or 378 liters). At the super high-end usage of about 2.5 liters per day (three bottles full, which is the equivalent to ten cups of water), it will need replacing roughly every 150 days. In reality, as you can pop the filter out when you’re drinking safe tap water and most travelers don’t come close to hitting the recommended daily servings of water (some studies show the average American drinks a mere per calendar year). Using that metric, one filter could last nearly two years.

Like the SteriPen, there are many versions of the Clearly Filtered bottle. While the stainless steel is more stylish (which I believe we are all aiming for in our water carrying vessels) I’ve tested both and found the BPA-free plastic Athletic Edition is the best model as it lets you expel water by squeezing — hence, you can rinse a wound, brush your teeth, squirt water at you boyfriend or really any other number of uses. It also makes drinking easier by allowing a gently squeeze to help the water make it’s way through the filter.

Buy here: 
Cost: $39.95
Weight: 4.8oz
Lifespan: Filters last 100 gallons, replacement filters cost $24.95

Clearly Filtered Travel Review

Pros to Clearly Filtered

• The filter needs replacing a lot less than a SteriPen needs recharging (though admittedly the recharges on the SteriPen are always free.)

• As previously mentioned, you can remove the filter and use it as a regular water bottle when you’re in a region that has safe tap water.

• It’s INSTANT. This is the big one. I am currently chugging three full bottles a day through this system, and I don’t think I could have reached that goal if it wasn’t so darn convenient to use.

Cons to Clearly Filtered

• You can’t add flavors or infusions to the water. It’s not the world’s largest drawback but it would be nice to add in a vitamin or electrolyte pack on occasion.

• This is the big one: you do kind of have to get used to the sucking system. Personally, I don’t even notice it anymore unless I’m at the gym or hiking or engaging in some physical activity in which I want to be straight gulping that delicious hydrogen oxygen cocktail. That said, every time a new friend tries drinking from my bottle, they always note with surprise that it’s “hard to drink.” I do think that after a few days it becomes such second nature that you don’t notice it ( you learn the subconscious squeezing trick). I’ve actually grown to be kind of fond of it, as it’s one of the rare times I do not spill a beverage all over myself — particularly handy when on bumpy transit.

Clearly Filtered Travel Review

The Winner

I love having both — because they each have their strengths and weaknesses. That said, these days I’ve primarily switched to using the Clearly Filtered bottle for day to day use, with the SteriPen sitting understudy in case my bottle should tragically disappear or malfunction. I also loan it to friends, and use it on those days I want to add something to my water.

Overall, I’m overjoyed to have access to clean drinking water straight from the tap, anywhere in the world.

A Few Final Notes

Unfortunately, there are still situations that render both these solutions useless. On Gili Trawangan in Indonesia, the water coming out of the taps was brackish (contained salt), which is a no-no with either of these products. So there, I utilized water refill stations whenever possible as compensation.

Remember to research your destination before departure. You might be surprised to find some of the places you’re headed are all clear — for example, I was thrilled to reach Panama City and find that I could take a few days off filtering and drink right from the tap (an extreme rarity in Central America).

Using either method, if you have access to a fridge, it’s great to fill or filter before bed and stick it in to chill so you can wake up to clean, ice cold H2O.

Clearly Filtered V Steripen_07

Why This Matters to Me

I’ve been spending a lot of time lately reflecting on why I write this blog and what the bigger picture is. Over time, living and traveling sustainably has become more and more important to me — and I want this blog to come along for the ride. Especially when it comes to sharing simple changes like this that require little sacrifice on the part of the consumer — and in fact, can overall enrich their lives.

I hear from you guys all the time about the places you’ve gone and the things you’ve done because you read about them on this blog. That makes my heart soar, and it’s good for you and it’s lovely for me. But if I can convince even a small percentage of y’all to order a product like this and eliminate a few more single-use plastics from their life, then that is good for the whole planet. I often make self-deprecating jokes about the triviality of this job but this time I’m playing it straight — what could be a prouder accomplishment for a blogger?

I’m not perfect. I forget my canvas totes and take the plastic bags. I drink Diet Cokes and cross my fingers they actually get recycled. I fly in big jet planes that emit carbons all over the place. But I’m working on it. Let’s take a step towards more sustainable travel. If anyone needs me, Imma just be digging out my old pom poms and working on some cheers for anyone who takes this step with me.

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Is there another personal filtration system you know and love? Let me know in the comments — I’m a fan of anything that keeps you safe, hydrated, and away from single-use plastics.

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I am an affiliate of both these products and will earn a small percentage of any resulting purchases at no additional cost to you. Clearly, both are products I use and love — I’d never recommend anything that didn’t fit that criteria. Thank you for supporting Meihoukai in Wanderland!
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52 Comments...
  • Mary B
    December 10 2015

    Three cheers for sustainability! I didn’t take any filtration system on my most recent trip, but was thrilled to learn that tap water in Tbilisi was clean so I could put my Nalgene to good use! When I did need to buy water, I tried to buy it in larger bottles and decant into my Nalgene for carrying around during the day, to cut down on the plastic trash. Next time, I’ll definitely take one of these fancy gadgets along with me!

    (side note: I LOLed at “I have not died from a water-borne illness even once.”)

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      Yup, that’s the system I used pre-2013. Also, some cities with unsafe drinking water (like Bangkok and Chiang Mai here in Thailand) have super cheap water refill stations where you can get a gallon for pennies. And when I was in Central America, tons of hostels had free drinking water available to guests with their own water bottles. So they are definitely worth bringing along!

  • So glad for the information! Going to look into purchasing one now 🙂
    Amanda | Lesson Plans & Layovers recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      And Christmas gifts for all your travel loving friends 🙂

  • LC
    December 10 2015

    Great post Meihoukai. I agree – it’s hard to be sustainable when travelling, but everything counts. Amazing how many cash dollars you save with something as small as having a reusable water bottle!
    LC recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      I know! I’m shocked more budget travelers don’t consider them when you really crunch the numbers.

  • Caroline
    December 10 2015

    just so you know, the purchase link doesn’t work for the below 🙂

    Clearly Filtered Athletic Edition

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      Whoops! Thanks for the heads up. Just updated 🙂 Looks like they changed their affiliate program months ago and never let me know. I was curious why I hadn’t seen a sale in ages…. good thing I really want people to use this product and the commission is just a bonus!

  • Jade
    December 10 2015

    This is a great review!
    But the link to the Clearly Filtered bottle won’t work for me for some reason and I want to help you get that affiliate sale!

    • Hannah
      December 10 2015

      I’ll be in central america in January and I was just looking into purchasing a self filtering water bottle! Perfect timing! But as some other have said the Clearly Filtered Bottle link is not working! Always looking to help a blogger out by purchasing through them. Let me know when it’s up!

      • Meihoukai
        December 10 2015

        Fixed! Argh. Like I said elsewhere, luckily I really care about people using this and the commission is a bonus because I just realized the affiliate program changed months ago and I had no idea as I wasn’t given a heads up. Ha ha.

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      Ha — looks like they changed their affiliate program months ago and never let me know. I was WONDERING why I hadn’t seen a sale in ages. Thanks for the heads up, I just updated 🙂

  • becky hutner
    December 10 2015

    I’m glad you feel as strongly about this as I do Meihoukai! And as a Camelback user, am eager to try Clearly Filtered now! We humans are intrinsically lazy and eliminating pesky steps like charging and shaking would make me use it all the more! & speaking of lazy…

    I’m too lazy to google this but I’m not sure most tap water we’re told is safe is actually safe. I have read there are varying degrees of fluoride and chlorine in US tap water for e.g. to the point where it’s recommended to even filter your shower to avoid transdermal absorption. I do filter my shower but don’t go so far as a Camelback with the tap water…just a simple filter jug.

    Also, while they are so pretty, photogenic & make mojito sipping SO much easier, I try to keep straw use to a minimum. Straws are plastic too & I hear we use something like 500 million of them per day in the US alone. They also get lodged in the throats of birds and marine life…I met an amazing rescue bird at a conservation center who had suffered this misfortune but luckily he lived so his keepers could share the tale! As I’m sure you know, there are straw alternatives made of paper, glass and steel…not sure of the practicality of traveling with them though.
    becky hutner recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      I have heard a bit about that here and there — usually when people in the US are getting defensive about drinking bottled rather than tap water 🙂 Personally I just drink straight out of the tap but if someone prefers to run it through a home Brita filter first, go wild. It’s probably a good idea and something I’d look into if I relocated permanently back to the US. (I wonder about those fancy refrigerator water dispensers a lot of people have now? What kind of filtration do they provide?)

      Straws are definitely a big one. I know a lot of the beach bars here have switched to biodegradable but I do agree it’s best to simply eliminate luxury products like that altogether when possible. Hm, you may have inspired me to order a steel straw and pop it in my purse, as I do drink a lot of mojitos…

    • Eva Casey
      December 11 2015

      Becky, it’s totally true about our tap water in the US! There’s all sorts of chemicals up in there. And with our bodies being constantly inundated by so many foreign substances every day, why not eliminate some and filter water? Those filtered water bottles have been a lifesaver for me! So easy!
      Eva Casey recently posted..

      • becky hutner
        December 12 2015

        Ya, I thought so Eva. Unfortunately I don’t take anything at face value these days. Too many documentaries have spoiled my once blissful ignorance!
        becky hutner recently posted..

  • Tammy Blomsterberg
    December 10 2015

    Thanks for sharing this! I’ve been looking to find a new water filter for traveling since my current one broke. I was considering the steri-pen so this was very helpful. I also think it’s so important to be environmentaly aware and do all we can to make a difference. 🙂
    Tammy Blomsterberg recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 10 2015

      Love hearing that Tammy. The SteriPen definitely deserves all the accolades it has received. It’s an amazing product. What were you using previously?

  • tammyonthemove
    December 11 2015

    I have never noticed how much plastic waste there is until I traveled to developing countries. In Europe you don’t tend to find a lot of rubbish on the streets, and in Germany you have to pay a deposit for buying plastic bottles which you then get back when you return the empty bottle to the shop.

    I currently live in Ghana which is the 7th dirtiest country in the world according to the WHO and UNICEF. Every day on my way to work I walk past piles and piles of plastic bottles and rubbish on the streets and sidewalks, as people just throw any rubbish on the floor and in the open sewers that line most streets. It looks horrible and is obviously terrible for the environment. As travelers we should all do our bit of preventing this and lead as an example to locals as well I think, so thanks for writing this article.
    tammyonthemove recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      Indeed. We have bottle deposits in New York as well and as a kid I used to love going to the can and bottle return with my parents! I was surprised to learn that only a handful of states in the US actually have that system!

  • Julie
    December 11 2015

    Love this, per usual. But, I must say – FERNGULLY! We had the VHS when I was growing up and watched it nearly on repeat for about 5 years. Mental math – I’m sure I’ve seen it 150 times at least. Yowza.
    Julie recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      Ha I love that movie so much. Avatar was nothing but a weak imitation in my mind 😉

  • Chris
    December 11 2015

    We carry a Steripen with us, but regret not getting a version that can be charged using USB (ours is an old school battery version).

    As such, that filtered bottle option seems pretty good to me!

    We also always brush our teeth with the local water (a few germs is the best we to build a strong and tolerant gut IMHO).

    Hell, there’s even occasions we’ve happily quaffed the local H2O when really we probably shouldn’t have… 😉
    Chris recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      I very much agree. I always eat local fruit and veg and salads too and don’t worry about where they’ve been rinsed. Seems to work out pretty well 🙂

  • Marie
    December 11 2015

    Great share. Thanks so much for this. I only heard about this from you. Horray! to inventors. As I read, it really is useful.

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      Thanks Marie! Hope you’ll consider purchasing one 🙂

  • Isabel
    December 11 2015

    Yay! Thanks so much for this post. I’d never heard of the steripen or the clearly filtered water bottle before you mentioned them in your previous posts. Since I’m planning a long-duration trip to South America soon, I was seriously debating buying one of the two you had previously written about but couldn’t decide on which one would work better for me. Plus: I’m not from the United states, and the filtered water bottles you can get here are all brands that only allow you to filter 100 liters – which is nothing compared to the brand you write about. I love how comprehensible this post is!
    I just have one question: have you experienced that the filter in the water bottle clogs up faster when using it with cloudy/foggy water?
    Happy greetings from Germany 🙂

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      Hey Isabel, glad you found it helpful! As the filter lasts a whole 100 gallons, there’s really no way to tell if it’s going faster or slower based on the quality of the water occasionally being cloudy. 99% of the time I use it with tap water, which runs pretty clear! Hope that helps.

      • Isabel
        December 12 2015

        It does 🙂 thanks again!

  • Eva Casey
    December 11 2015

    It’s shocking to me how many travelers still purchase tons of plastic water bottles! Even when we’re usually a fairly conscious bunch. For me, I’ve always hated the taste of tap water so I basically have to filter it. I use those cheap filtered water bottles now which are great, but I had no idea that it didn’t protect against viruses! Luckily, Costa Rica and Puerto Rico have pretty safe drinking water or I may have gotten a nasty surprise! I will look into the Clearly Filtered bottle for my next trip.
    Eva Casey recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      Yeah, I’ve read that outside the beach areas it’s fine to drink tap water in Costa Rica (not sure about Puerto Rico.) Of course if you’re on a one week vacation, you might as well use a filtered bottle anyway as you could be sensitive to local bacteria that regular drinkers are used to. I do like to brush my teeth with local tap water so I’m a little immunized 🙂

  • Natalie
    December 12 2015

    This was really helpful Meihoukai. I’ve looked at these before but haven’t purchased them as I usually have potable water. The times I haven’t, I’ve been in country long term and had a larger filtering system. Now that I’m planning some shorter trips to developing areas, I think this would be a great thing to add to my pack. Thanks!
    Natalie recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 12 2015

      You’re welcome Natalie! I’m surprised to see more expats in Thailand don’t have larger filtering systems. I only know one here on Koh Tao that does — everyone else has been drinking nothing but bottled water for years!

  • Jael
    December 13 2015

    At times like these, I feel terribly proud to be born and raised in a third world country where boiling tap water is the norm (Malaysia). I’ve never gone traveling abroad all the way until I hit college and all of the local hotels I’ve been to had kettles. Some are rusty and looks extremely dodgy, but we managed somehow with a combination of bottled water and refilling said plastic bottles with funny tasting boiled tap water. Looking back at it, I’m terribly impressed I survived through all that, though I sure as well won’t be using a rusty kettle ever again!

    • Meihoukai
      December 13 2015

      Ha, yeah, that doesn’t sound too tasty. But I do admire your ingenuity!

  • Leigh
    December 13 2015

    Thank you for spreading the word to your readers! I’m so happy to see places like O’Hare converting their drinking fountains to allow you to fill a large water bottle (after years of trying to fill them by tilting to the fountain, which never worked!) – they even have a little electronic counter of how many water bottles have been saved.

    Unfortunately, when I was ready for the purchase, I couldn’t find a Clearly Filtered one to buy, so I bought a LifeStraw. I’ll have to do my research, though, to make sure it’s as effective. I’ve also got a Steri-Pen on my Christmas list, as that will also come in handy on backpacking trips!
    Leigh recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 14 2015

      Yes, I always cheer when I see bottle refill stations in public buildings! The LifeStraw has a very similar filter to the Clearly Filtered bottle, it just doesn’t have the convenience of an attached bottle. But it’s definitely a very safe method!

  • Britt
    December 14 2015

    I’ve always been too paranoid to think about investing in one of these products. I thought there must be some catch and surely it couldn’t work properly to protect me from water borne diseases.

    But I think I might have to trust you on this one 😉

    Lucky for me I’m in Europe for the next 10 months so won’t have to worry about not being able to drink the tap water for the time being. The hardest thing here is finding somewhere to fill up, Germany is notoriously bad for not having water bubblers and you have to pay for public toilets. So I have to be proactive about where I want to fill up.

    Also good on you for wanting to make a difference. I’m all for trying to improve our sustainability. For me, I try to fly as little as possible, preferring trains, buses and over public transport where its practical. I also have switched to solid products like solid soap, solid shampoo and solid conditioner not just because of their convenience while travelling but also because they don’t have plastic bottles.
    Britt recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 15 2015

      That’s awesome, Britt. Let me know if you end up going for one of these guys, and what you think 🙂 Hopefully you’ll love them as much as your solid toiletries!

  • Danie
    December 15 2015

    The Grayl.

    • Meihoukai
      December 23 2015

      I’ve been looking into that, and think I might just need to add it to my lineup here! Thanks for the tip!

  • Eliza and Chris
    December 20 2015

    We totally agree Meihoukai. We’re currently in India and the number of discarded plastic water bottles littering the streets is staggering. We use the Sawyer mini water filter. It will filter up to 100,000 gallons of water and gets rid of 99.99999 of bacteria. So far,so good!

    • Meihoukai
      December 26 2015

      Yay! That makes me so darn happy to hear. Keep fighting the good fight 🙂

  • Terra
    December 22 2015

    There is a few things that I am so thankful I decided to bring along while traveling and living abroad and that is my Steripen. It has allowed me to reduce the amount of water bottles during my travels, and even while living in China. I had never heard of the Clearly Filtered bottle, but after reading your review, I might need to add it to my wish list! Thanks for the great review.
    Terra recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      December 26 2015

      That’s awesome, Terra. Makes me so happy to hear from travelers who have found these solutions and are making such a positive impact towards their travels with them!

  • Jo Abba
    August 15 2016

    I was unable to find the Athletic Edition via your link. Is it no longer available?

    • Meihoukai
      August 17 2016

      Hey Jo, have you checked Amazon? I ordered a few from there not too long ago. Let me know if you find okay!

  • Svea
    November 30 2016

    Hi Meihoukai,
    thank you very much for sharing your experiences with water treatment systems and giving some great advices. I was wondering if you have ever used other technologies such as chemical drops or other filter systems (pump filters or gravity filters)? And what would be the most important aspect to consider when buying one of the system? (Reliability, speed, capacity etc.)? Would you also suggest the SteriPen for travels in larger groups or would you switch to other technologies with greater capacity? Thank you so much! I am looking forward to hearing from you!

    • Meihoukai
      December 5 2016

      Hey Svea! No, I’ve never tried chemical drops — and I’m not sure what kind of filter the SteriPen qualifies as but it’s the only one I tried. For me the most important factors are convenience and portability. The SteriPen is great for sharing between two or three though you’d have to stagger use if you wanted to share it among more people (ie. don’t all fill up your bottles at the same time or you’ll be waiting for a while.) Hope that helps! Good luck!

  • McKenzie
    September 12 2017

    Great read! Safe drinking water is a must. There are many different purification bottles out there. Thank you for sharing all about these!

    • Meihoukai
      September 22 2017

      You’re welcome McKenzie! I love sharing ideas about being eco-friendly!