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Five years ago, I wrote a picky-eating traveler’s manifesto, a confessional regarding my extremely limited palate, and a gentle plea to others to get their opinions off my plate. Five years is a long time, and recently, loyal readers started to pick up on hints at my bolder eating habits. “Maybe it’s time for an update?” they teased. Indeed, these days, I’m not quite as picky.

me, phở or five years ago

There are still a few major food categories and ingredients that I won’t entertain, including seafood, beer, mushrooms, coffee, olives, red wine, mayonnaise, sour cream, blue cheese, and any cut of meat with a name that includes a facial feature. I also still can’t stomach much spice, though my tolerance for it has increased marginally. The two categories that still cause the most headaches are seafood and beer, as seafood is often the primary protein source in much of the world (even the smell of it cooking can make me gag) and both are quite awkward to refuse when hospitably offered in social situation (being the only wine or cocktail drinker among a new group of friends who are buying rounds at the bar still makes me cringe). That said, beer isn’t exactly the healthiest of beverages to aspire to drink, and the more I learn about the and in the seafood industry, the less I care about ever finding a fish I could confidently order off a menu. At this point in my life, I’m generally pretty unapologetic about the list of things I won’t consume.

And that’s in part because the list of things I do is longer than ever before. It includes pretty much every fruit and vegetable under the sun (I still maintain that kale tastes like dirt though), beans (I specifically mention not eating them in my original post), hummus (my favorite snack with raw veggies), curries (massaman is one of my weekly staples), herbs like lemongrass and ginger (yum!) and even a few dishes from once off-limits cuisines like Indian (bring on the jalfreezi and saag paneer). Recently, I tried seasoned tofu for the first time and have even started occasionally ordering salads topped with it. If you just heard a thud while reading that sentence, it was my mother fainting and falling backwards off her chair.

How did this happen? I think the change was brought on by a combination of age, travel experience, and the pursuit of a healthier lifestyle. I think it’s pretty standard that some pickiness will just be grown out of, as slowly enjoying a wider variety of foods with age is a common yarn I hear spun over and over again.

And though I resisted, travel slowly introduced me to flavors I either didn’t know existed, or didn’t know I was capable of loving. I realized that there were curries I could eat when a mild yellow version was the only thing served on a day-long dive trip in Vietnam. A summer in Scotland made me fall for hard ciders, while a road trip around Upstate New York finally introduced me to the wine of my dreams. My time in Central America set me up with the love of my life, avocados (I want to weep when I think of all the years I wasted not eating guacamole), and I believe it was in Indonesia that I finally accepted that occasionally mealtime meant pointing to various plates of unidentified vegetables and having them piled onto a banana leaf. (I am still very particular about the cuts and quality of meat I eat, which does still limit the street food experiences I’m able to enjoy.)

Finally, as my desire to be a leaner, healthier person grew stronger, I very naturally developed a preference for nutrient-rich super foods like cashew nuts, spinach and quinoa and started shying away from previous staples like white bread and white rice.

You know what has never worked? Being shamed into liking a new food. I loathe food bullies! What has worked is gentle recommendations from friends who are non-judgmental of my limited palate. A pressure-free “hey, I know how much you like ____ and so I think you might enjoy trying a bite of this ____,” has introduced me to many dishes I now love.

I wrote that first post because I wanted to vent and I wanted other picky eaters to know their limited palates didn’t have to hold them back from exploring the world. There are many travelers out there who consider food one of the most important aspects of their literal and metaphorical journeys – don’t sweat if it won’t be the most important aspect for you. Something else will! I wrote this post because I wanted to let picky eaters with a strong case of wanderlust know that they might someday surprise themselves with the things they order at a restaurant or reach for at a market.

And if you happen to see me there, enthusiastically tucking into a warm spinach salad with pork and pears (a recipe I pinned earlier today!), I’ll happily offer you a bite. If you decline, no worries – I won’t raise an eyebrow no matter what you order.

Any other current or reformed picky eaters out there? Holla in the comments and let’s talk survival tips!

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59 Comments...
  • Mary B
    March 11 2016

    I think growing up is certainly a piece of it – my mom constantly says “wow! I didn’t know you ate [brussels sprouts, kale, shrimp, etc]” every time we eat together… and true, when I was growing up I lived on Kraft mac and cheese and steamed broccoli. I have to gently remind her that I’m 33 and lots of things have changed, including my palate 😉

    Although I only eat the kale because it’s good for me…
    Mary B recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Ha, yeah, kale is still my least favorite leafy green! Well, maybe that and iceberg lettuce, if it even counts. Bring on the spinach and arugula! Brussel sprouts are also not my fave but I will eat them. I absolutely love me some broccoli, asparagus, zucchini, bell peppers… and yes, Mac n Cheese on occasion 😉

      • Andrea
        March 13 2016

        I only started eating kale after I read this post on Cookie and Kate .

        If even that doesn’t make you like kale, look at other recipes. The best super-food website! 🙂
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        • Meihoukai
          March 14 2016

          Oooo, awesome website, thanks for the recommendation! I actually do occasionally order kale salads at restaurants if the rest of the ingredients are calling to me but if I had it my way I’d sub in spinach or arugula every time.

  • Sanna
    March 11 2016

    Ah, so much fun to hear this from someone else! I’m also a really picky eater, especially when it comes to meat (anything even a little bit too chewy or which has a weird consistency makes me lose my appetite right away). Thankfully it has improved slightly over the years, but I’m a long way from having the culinary travels I’m hearing about from everyone else.

    My go-to excuse is to pretend I’m a vegetarian, since I’m fine with vegetables in general, and trying to explain that my palate is like a six-year-olds (but slightly healthier) is just too damn complicated.
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    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Ha, yes, going “vegetarian” or feigning a food allergy is a lot more acceptable to most. Which is kind of funny because aren’t our taste buds beyond our control in the same way that our allergies are? I know allergies can obviously be extremely serious but I guess I wonder what the difference is to random people who seem to care so deeply what picky people eat.

  • I always forget that you are semi-picky given that you’re so adventurous in every other respect! I used to be anti-seafood, so I understand your concerns there, though now I do like most fish, scallops, shrimp, etc. (still can’t get behind oysters or mussels, blech). But as a diver, it is really hard for me to eat fish like grouper or flounder that I so love spotting underwater!
    Kristin @ Camels & Chocolate recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      That’s definitely another factor! The more I dive, the less I want to eat fish. They are my little underwater buddies, after all!

  • lisa
    March 11 2016

    Omgosh…I knew we were long lost soul sisters. I just literally sat down to write a post about…you guessed it…food while traveling. Considering my list of ‘won’t eat’ or ‘can’t eat’ is about as long as my arm traveling can be a challenge. Ordering ‘no salt’ and ‘sauce on the side’ is not easy in Southeast Asia…lol! They look at me like I’m a bit crazy. I have learned to own my preferences instead of being embarrassed and like you have now slowly become a bit more adventurous. Oh…that stops at eating insects…just not there yet…lol!

    • Tammy Blomsterberg
      March 11 2016

      I loved your comment because I’m vegan, gluten free and don’t like to eat salt or oil. It can be a bit challenging and funny sometimes when I’m ordering at a restaurant. 🙂 I’ve figured out how to keep it simple especially when I’m traveling.

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Oh hell no — no bugs 😉 I am curious how the no sauce thing works in Asia considering the main form of cooking is stir frying. Are they able to do that sans sauce? Or are you referring to other things? I always get sauce/dressing on the side when possible — salads, steaks, etc. But I generally love the soy-sauce based stir fries available everywhere on this continent!

      • Lisa
        March 12 2016

        It’s kind of comical but I will have a local write me a little note. I am super sensitive to salt so usually I end up with things stir fried in oil and water. In Vietnam they actually have MSG on the table as a condiment…yikes! I’m leaving next week for a couple of months in Indonesia which include a remote Raja Ampat Homestay. I forsee becoming even more adventurous with food happening or I might starve! And I’m with you…not eating any creepy things with lots of legs.
        You crack me up btw….I just read your packing post again as I snuck a second pair of leggings in my suitcase. ?

        • Meihoukai
          March 14 2016

          That is definitely clever, having a local write you a note 🙂 I’ll add that to my list of future picky eater travel tips!

  • Gemma
    March 11 2016

    Hilarious post! I am not the culprit, Craig is! South East Asia was a ‘mare as he doesn’t eat coconut milk or fish (so no fish sauce). I can’t eat cilantro though so South Am has been a bit tricky for me. PASS ME THAT MANGO!
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    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Oh man, I can see how the coconut milk thing would be really tricky. I thought I didn’t like coconut for much of my life but I think growing up in Upstate New York I just had only tried weird coconut flavored things and not like A REAL COCONUT. Now I am obsessed with them and consume some form of them almost every day!

  • Kathryn Allen
    March 11 2016

    Well, I didn’t fall off my chair, but I did reread the sentence about seasoned tofu. You’ll have to introduce me to it this summer, as I’ve always found the texture, um, let’s just say unappetizing. Ditto olives. I can confidently say that I’ll go to my grave without ever eating an olive. Again, the smell!

    The photos of food are making me hungry…every plate looks delicious! What is under the egg?

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Some sort of Thai stir fry 🙂 Maybe pork with basil? Yes, the tofu thing was a shock for me too. There’s this one restaurant here called Vegetabowl and she seasons it herself. Nice and crispy and delicious! I’m still not sure I’d be up for the standard version.

  • Tammy Blomsterberg
    March 11 2016

    Great post! I was a bit of a picky eater and didn’t like a lot of veggies as a kid and now I’m vegan and LOVE veggies! I do think our taste buds change as we grow and it helps to try new things and even things we once didn’t like.

    For me the list of things I do eat is so much longer than it was now that I’m vegan. I’ve discovered so many new foods like quinoa,kale and lentils. I also didn’t like avocado and now it’s one of my favorite foods. 🙂
    Tammy Blomsterberg recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      I’m not vegan or even vegetarian but eating at a lot of vegan restaurants over the last year has really opened up my palate and made me appreciate a lot of new dishes and ingredients. I used to not consider something a meal if there wasn’t meat in it! These days I quite often go without.

  • Tracy
    March 11 2016

    Your photos are making me hungry! I’d eat all those meals – look so delicious.

    I was such a picky kid and have a similar story – traveling and getting older I am sure have a big influence. It’s reassuring to read as I worry about my fussy two year old but you’ve reminded me it’s normal 🙂 And you look super healthy so must be doing something right 🙂
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    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      If only I were a little pickier about desserts 😉 I think it helps that I am no longer picky about vegetables. I hear from a lot of picky eaters that they don’t like ANY vegetables and that is one thing that would worry me as they are such a major source of vitamins and nutrients to the body. I suppose supplements could help…

  • Loved this post! I’ve always been a picky eater, and was raised in a household where, if you didn’t eat your dinner, it made a 2nd appearance at breakfast!

    I definitely thing age has a lot to do with it – after college, when dating involved dining, I was too embarrassed to be picky and would try new things that way. But I’m still not a fan of most veggies, which is obviously not so healthy! Seafood, on the other hand, I could eat almost every day 🙂

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Yes, dating makes a HUGE difference! Although I have to say in the last few years, anyone who bullied me about my eating habits was immediately out of there. My current boyfriend loves to cook and has introduced me to a lot of foods without a hint of food bullying — he’s a keeper.

  • Katie
    March 11 2016

    I have also become a lot more adventurous with my eating although I am still pretty fussy when it comes to cuts and types of meat (red meat doesn’t agree with me and I don’t really like the taste, and I can’t abide any fatty meat), I eat pretty much everything else.
    Katie recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      I detest fatty meat. I take the leanest cut I can, every time! I don’t even like skin on my chicken. Ah, I love it when my preferences align with what is healthy (rare as it may be.)

  • Rachael
    March 11 2016

    HELL YES! This problem has plagued me my whole life, I could have written it myself. I don’t like onion. ONION! Everything has onion in it. I never used to like tomatoes, but I am coming around. I hate blue cheese, seafood (with the exception of salmon), any dessert that has fruit in it (I can only handle fresh fruit – baked fruit in desserts make me gag), and am super picky about the quality of meat I eat as well. It sounds silly but it totally affects your life! It makes it hard and kind of embarrassing when traveling. My palate has definitely expanded as well – curry, avocado etc. Like I said, I could have written your post. Tastebud twins, unite!

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Ha, one of my best friends here in Thailand also loathes onion and I see what a struggle it is for him 🙂 Tastebud twins indeed — I’m so weird about tomatoes. Finely chopped or liquefied into sauce? Hell yes. Left super chunky or God forbid, whole? I’m going to have to gag slightly to get it down.

  • Justine
    March 11 2016

    Kudos to you for branching out a little bit during the past five years. I agree that avocados are amazing and I’m happy to have you in the guacamole fan club 🙂 As a vegetarian traveler picky eating is something I can completely relate too. I honestly loathe telling people I’m a vegetarian. I always feel so awkward eating out with people. And now that I’m a vegetarian expat in China I’m dealing with my picky eating woes on a daily basis. It’s tough because here in China when you dine with people everything is shared, which means I can’t really eat much. I just sort of have to nibble on the very few options in front of me (if I’m lucky!). I’ve tried to be a little bit less intense about how strict I am. But after being a vegetarian with very specific habits for 17 years it’s tough to change my ways. I’m trying my best to educate myself about what I can eat here in China because I don’t want to miss out on the amazing food here. And I thank my lucky stars for the awesome produce market down the street from my apartment 🙂
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    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      I feel you on the group dining situations. I actually love ordering family style if I’m with the rare group of people who either share my proclivities or are sympathetic to them, but otherwise I’m just like ugh can I get a separate check please. I have found that being confident and unapologetic goes a long way — if you act sorry, food bullies WILL pounce! 😉

  • Francesca
    March 11 2016

    There might be hope for you yet as an olive lover don’t worry. I hated them to the point that I’d gag if I accidentally put one in my mouth but suddenly found my tastebuds converted when I sampled some local ones in southern Spain.

    My other half had EXACTLY the same reaction as me. A lifelong loathing that has now turned to love after many, many tapas plates consumed in Seville last summer.

    There must be something about eating olives in Spain that converts the haters!
    Francesca recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Well hey, with an endorsement like that I promise to try one in your honor if I’m ever in Seville 🙂 Considering how many bruschetta dishes olives feature in, I wouldn’t mind not hating them.

  • Fernanda
    March 12 2016

    Hey Meihoukai,
    I am a super picky eater too. As a young kid I decided I didn’t like beans (which Brazilians eat every single day in almost every meal) and as my autonomy increased with age so did my list of non edible foods. No sea food, no pork, no beer, no rosemary, no Indian, Chinese or Japanese and I have recently discovered I probably have a gene mutation that makes hate cucumber with a passion!
    When my friends thought it couldn’t be any harder to go out for dinner with me I became vegetarian for ethical reasons like climate change and animal welfare. Which actually made it a bit easier for me, for some reason people respect you more for being vegetarian than for only eating “acceptable” cuts of chicken and beef.
    Travel has also broaden my horizons a bit, I have discovered and now love a good cider, increased my tolerance to chilly and found out that some Indian dishes are actually OK.
    I love going out to eat and trying new places but I will not eat anything I don’t know what it is and hate putting myself in a situation a have to eat what I am given. When it comes to exploring a new country food is where I draw the line, I don’t have to try everything a country eats or even their national dish to experience a country and its culture, I will do my best to do it, but if it includes meat or any other ingredients on my black list I am out.
    Although the food bullying bothers me a lot I feel zero guilt about my eating habits. Seriously what difference does it make to other people what I eat or don’t? #stopfoodbullying!

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Yeah, I’m not sure what the deal is with others caring SO INTENSELY about what is on other people’s plates. I know there are some very picky eaters who don’t like ANY vegetables or fruit and I suppose I would be concerned if it was someone I cared about that they were getting the vitamins and nutrients they needed to thrive. But as long as someone is healthy… who cares? I don’t cook often but when I do I am not offended is someone doesn’t eat what I made because they are gluten-free, vegetarian, not a fan of pears, whatever.

  • Ijana
    March 12 2016

    You’re right, when in doubt the best way to get around eating anything questionable is to load up on fruits and vegetables. I dislike seafood (except the occasional salmon) and don’t want any sort of dressing or condiments. I’ll taste most everything but I’m definitely not one of those people who travels for food!

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      I’m not a huge dressing or condiment fan, either. I find that the salads I eat are generally pretty juicy on their own thanks to lots of fresh veg or fruit and don’t need much if anything at all in the way of dressing. And obviously, anything made with mayo or blue cheese is an instant no go 🙂

  • Kate
    March 12 2016

    So much yes (and not just cuz i’m tipsy on wine right now). My own tastes and eating habits have developed a lot throughout my life and I LOATHE food bullies. I want so badly to snap back “sorry that my childhood mostly consisted of PB sandwhiches without j since there wasn’t a lot of cash and my foodie pallet isn’t as elitist as yours but hey aren’t we all a work in progress after all and ps-back off” but I never do because that’s a lot more aggressive than I ever am in real life. In reality I end up apologizing and always finding something delicious to eat on my own. While I haven’t traveled as extensively as you, I haven’t let my food issues hold me back, either. But I do worry as I eat all seafood and no meat and so in certain places I think it’s tough. And that’s the end of this lengthly buzzed comment which just really is to say HEAR HEAR I AGREE. Thank you.

    • Meihoukai
      March 12 2016

      Ha ha, I love a good tipsy comment section. I feel ya on the snap back, though my reply would have more to do with having two more-than-full-time working parents who grew up in the bland midwest and themselves weren’t really aware vegetables were available outside a can until well into their own adulthoods. To this day my dad would eat steak and a potato every night of his life if left to his own devices, and my mom can’t eat Chipotle because she finds it too spicy. And because my parents were often at the office at dinner time, our college age babysitters did a lot of the cooking… Mac n Cheese as about as gourmet as they got, understandably. I’m not blaming anyone for my own palate by any means — my parents did their best to trick me into eating seafood when I was a kid! — but food bullies should remember that diverse backgrounds are definitely a factor.

  • Melanie Fontaine
    March 12 2016

    Reformed picky eater right here! 🙂 I think it’s crazy to see how much eating habits can change over time – I never really shied away from other cuisines – though I largely attribute that to being half-chinese and therefore being confronted with different flavors from early childhood on – but I used to absolutely hate vegetables growing up and never voluntarily ate them. My mother tried to make me do it, but just the thought of a side of carrots would have made me want to run for the hills. If I could go back in time and tell her that there are now so many veggies that I love, she would surely be shocked!
    I think what really changed my attitude towards vegetables was developing an interest in cooking. Seeing gorgeous food photography in cookbooks really made me want to try new things and taught me that I didn’t actually hate vegetables, but the way they were so often prepared – and slowly, but surely that made me change my attitude towards food in general. Let’s see how our palates will continue to change over time! 🙂
    Melanie Fontaine recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 13 2016

      Totally agree — it’s all about how veggies are cooked! I still love a basic steamed broccoli but I literally drool at the thought of carrots glazed with honey, asparagus cooked with bacon bits, and spinach sauteed with garlic. YUM.COM.

  • Dominique
    March 12 2016

    I hear you! I used to be a picky eater in the sense that I was always scared to eat outside of the house. When I moved out to go to university that completely went away. I’m picky when I see things I’ve never tried before. I always prefer picking something on a menu I’ve eaten, because I know chances are bigger I’ll enjoy my food. Coriander is one of the things that I don’t appreciate in my food. I can smell it from a mile off. Ginger is something I would prefer not to have in my food, but I do occasionally cook with it. Humans are strange creatures 😉
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    • Meihoukai
      March 13 2016

      Ha, indeed we are 🙂 I used to hate or think I hated ginger, but these days I’m TOTALLY obsessed with it. Wild how things can change!

  • Erin
    March 12 2016

    There are so many shared “things we wont eat/drink” including: seafood, beer, olives, sour cream (mixed in something sure), blue cheese. I have had guacamole before and liked it…but i dont like avocados alone. Have you ever tried baking with them? Great way to use a healthy fat in recipes instead of like butter or oil. Look on Pinterest 🙂
    You know what grosses me out? People that eat cottage cheese right out of the container… one time a guy at work brought a container of cottage cheese and a container of yogurt and mixed them together and ate it. I almost threw up. lol

    • Meihoukai
      March 14 2016

      I never thought about baking with avocados — interesting idea! And oh man, cottage cheese is another one on my very strict no go list!

  • Steph
    March 13 2016

    YES. This is totally my jam. I used to be super fussy but I’ve slowly become more open-minded with food and it’s all thanks to travel. My greatest hurdle is still to come: I want to travel India but I hate hate HATE Indian food. This is actually stopping me from going so it’s a big problem for me. Hopefully one day, fingers crossed.

    Also, THANK YOU for bringing up ‘food-shamers’! It’s all I ever had growing up amongst adventurous eaters and it did nothing but knock my self-esteem. When it comes to food, each to their own in my opinion.

    • Meihoukai
      March 14 2016

      I feel you, I used to DREAD when friends wanted to go to Indian restaurants. These days I actually have one that I love and regularly look forward to eating there! If you’re looking for some starter tips from a fellow picky eater, I’d try ordering butter chicken — it’s a really mild tomato based sauce and not too spicy. Eat with garlic naan, of course 🙂 And if you like spinach, saag paneer is a nice mild sauteed spinach dish with cheese. Good luck!

  • Tracey
    March 13 2016

    hallelujah!!! Another picky eater that travels, and I am also a vegetarian that hates vegetables! Everyone joked I would die of Scurvy if I didn’t broaden my horizons, well 30 years later I am still going strong.

    • Meihoukai
      March 14 2016

      That is a tough one! I hear from a lot of really picky eaters that they don’t like vegetables and get the nutrients from vitamin supplements but I can imagine those would be a pain to travel long term with.

  • Julia Kitlinski-Hong
    March 15 2016

    I can definitely relate to this post! I love to try new foods, but there are definitely some that I will not budge on. A big one is oysters. Saying that, there are a lot of foods that I’ve grown to love as I’ve gotten older like goat cheese and kimchee 🙂
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    • Meihoukai
      March 15 2016

      Goat cheese has really grown on me too! Kimchee I’m still a little scared of, but I’ll definitely give it a try someday, I’m sure!

  • I’m totally with you Meihoukai – I’ve gone through a similar transition although sounds like you eat more than I do! I was totally against fruit & veg for many years but as I’ve got older and travelled more I’ve discovered so much amazing food that I wouldn’t have gone near before! Now I absolutely love trying new stuff, I know that sometimes I just won’t like it, but I’m always up for trying things now and for me that makes all the difference…

    My biggest thing was that certain food groups shouldn’t go together (a fried egg on rice?! WTF?! – Nasi Goreng is now one of my fave dishes btw!) but I also think trying food in more exotic places makes it more exciting and therefore I think you’re more open to the idea that they might be nice.

    I rediscovered pineapple in Thailand for example and devour the stuff whenever I can now. I found out coconut can actually taste nice when I attempted coconut sambol in Sri Lanka… I could go on and on, but you get the gist!

    So, word up to all the picky eaters in the world – don’t let that stop you from travelling, you’ll always find things you can eat and you’re very likely to discover new things on the way. 😀
    Keri @ Ladies what travel recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 17 2016

      Oh Keri, I know how you feel. Weird food groups being together was a serious issue for me for a long time. I’ve always LOVED fruit but I was horrified by the idea of it in any dishes that weren’t a fruit salad. I finally got over that and now I love it in salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more. Funny little mental barrier 🙂

  • Stef
    March 19 2016

    I wouldn’t call me a picky eater but my eating definitely changed while being in Mexico. I “learned” to eat spicy. Seriously I couldn’t eat anything spicy but now I always have to have chili. Travel changes the way you eat.
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    • Meihoukai
      March 21 2016

      Yeah, my tolerance to spice has definitely increased over the years though I still have been known to shed a few involuntary tears if I get too much chili in there. I just can’t get used to that feeling of my tongue and lips burning!

  • Jessica
    March 19 2016

    All the food in those photos looks so yummy, I want to eat all of it! And I’m totally with you on avocados. I can’t believe I spent my youth rejecting them when now I can’t seem to get enough.
    Jessica recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      March 21 2016

      It’s almost painful not having easy access to them here on Koh Tao! I can’t WAIT to be back in the land of guacamole.

  • Natalie
    March 25 2016

    I find travel has expanded my food choices too, especially after serving in the Peace Corps. When you live in a country with limited options, you pretty much choose to eat or go hungry…lol. As a side note, I used to be allergic to soy and survived 5 weeks in China without having a reaction. That was a fun experience!
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    • Meihoukai
      March 29 2016

      I bet that would do the trick for a lot of picky eater! I used to pretty stubbornly go hungry, but I’ve learned to be a lot more adventurous.

  • Mike
    December 30 2016

    If you can survive with Thai food, and vietnam food, you can survive anywhere.

    • Meihoukai
      January 11 2017

      Actually, I found Vietnam fairly easy to navigate as a super picky eater… I just had phô all day every day!