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Hey friends! I’m jumping out of my typical chronologically-based coverage to skip ahead and share my recent trip to Canada. We’ll be back to Thailand soon!

Why are you here?

It wasn’t an existential question, it was a literal one. The evening before taking off on our Churchill adventure, my tour group gathered and listened intently as our guide Doug asked us what had brought us there, to the conference room of a Winnipeg airport hotel eagerly awaiting the next morning’s departure. One by one, almost every single one of my travel companions confessed that while they knew it wasn’t peak season, they’d come to this remote corner of Canada in search of polar bears. I, too, was anxious to see bears — and to experience the bizarre and beautiful little town that is Churchill.

But more than anything, I’d made this journey in search of the true star of Churchill summers: beluga whales.

Kayaking with Beluga Whales Churchill Canada

Snorkeling with Beluga Whales Churchill Canada

Unlike the out-of-season polar bears, belugas couldn’t have been more abundant. Our trip over the last week in July overlapped with the absolute peak timing to visit the approximately fifty-seven thousand iconic white whales that congregate at the mouth of the Churchill River each summer.

Throughout my four days in Churchill, I had three unique opportunities to get to know these magical mammals — each more immersive than the last.

Warming Up With the Prince of Wales and Beluga Whales Tour

You’ve got to ease into this whole “being best friends with belugas” thing. And there’s no better way than spotting some from the comfort of a boat bound for . After receiving a briefing on boat safety and whale biology, we hopped aboard for the short ride over the river. Fun fact: the fort is only accessible by boat from about June to August. From December to April you can visit by skidoo and from October to November, it’s helicopter only!

Once we touched down across the river, we were met by both a Parks Canada interpretive guide and an armed bear guard, who had a rifle slung over his shoulder and a pair of binoculars around his neck. The morning we visited was cursed with what was unquestionably the worst weather of our trip, and we strained to hear our guide over the howling wind and our chattering teeth.

Built by the Hudson Bay Company in the 1700’s, Fort Prince of Wales tells the story of Churchill’s importance in the fur trade as the French and English vied for control of the area. Truth be told, I was more interested in pestering our guide with questions about modern life in Churchill after he revealed he was born and raised there and couldn’t fathom living anywhere else.

Beluga Whales and Prince of Wales Fort

Beluga Whales and Prince of Wales Fort

As we walked back towards the boat, the bear guide was on high alert — a few were ambling slowly in the far distance. While we all paused for a moment to squint at the white specks on the horizon, we moved on quickly. We had other mammals to get to.

It was a rough, rocky day and I struggled to stay steady on the boat with my enormous rented camera lens weighing down my . While we scanned the surface for sightings, I chatted with one of the guides onboard, Meihoukai, a photography junkie who had recently moved to Churchill permanently after working several high seasons there. He just couldn’t stay away.

Together, we kept our eyes peeled for flashes of grey. Belugas are born a dark hue and slowly lose their color as they grow older — I delighted whenever babies made an appearance.

Before I arrived, I’d read that Churchill’s Hudson Bay coastline has the largest beluga whale population on earth. From atop the boat that day, I believed it. We were surrounded.

Beluga Whales Churchill Manitoba

Beluga Whales Churchill Manitoba

Eventually, our captain dropped in a hydrophone, a special underwater microphone that broadcasts the whale’s songs onto the boat, and I put down my camera to eavesdrop on their conversations.

I couldn’t wait to get closer.

Kayaking Alongside Giants

Due to the choppy weather on our boat tour, we’d been warned our afternoon activity may be cancelled. Thankfully, the winds calmed, the skies parted, and those of us who’d signed up made our way back to the river for an opportunity to get even closer to our new blubbery buddies.

Kayaking is technically an add-on activity, meaning it isn’t a part of the itinerary of the standard tour itinerary. But I was happy to trade a few hours of free time for a kayak paddle with , as were four others on my tour. Other add-on options included helicopter tours to view the whales from above (which one family in our group tried and loved) and snorkeling (which I tried and loved — see below!)

Our guide Jocelyn was no casual kayaker. This amazing adventurer scoffed at the idea of taking a plane or a train to Churchill, and instead spent sixty-four days — nearly 1,000 miles from the capital of Winnipeg. Needless to say, we felt we were in good hands.

That said, feeling a spray of the icy water on my hand, I knew I’d never wanted to flip a kayak less.

The day was gorgeous, and I felt a sense of exhilaration before we’d had even a single wildlife sighting. Yet it didn’t take long before curious whales began breaching alongside our vessels. My fellow paddler Tiffany and I laughed and shrieked as we spotted bubbles around each other’s kayaks, a sure sign we were about to hear the distinct sound of a blowhole exhaling beside us.

Twice, I locked eyes with a beluga as it glided beside me, staring curiously upwards at this strange creature sharing its path. Once, I felt the nudge of a whal gently bumping up against my kayak. It’s an expression that’s often used in jest or with sarcasm, but I truly felt high on life.

It was pure joy.

Going Eye to Eye on a Snorkeling Excursion

The next day brought my final and most profound beluga encounter yet. Getting in the water with them.

Kayaking with Beluga Whales Churchill Canada

While the rest of our group set off on a zodiac ride around the river, an adventurous few gathered to don ungodly amounts of neoprene and snorkels, jump off the sides of those zodiacs, and get eye to eye with the whales that had been flirting with us for days.

I found myself anxious in the days leading up to this excursion, both out of overwhelming excitement and slight unease and the thought of the dark, cold waters I’d be slipping into. “What about polar bears?” was my primary question — and I fair one I thought, considering they and orcas are the beluga’s only natural predators. Our guides would keep an eye out, I was assured.

Snorkeling with Beluga Whales Churchill Canada

Summoning courage, I slipped into the water. The rain and wind of the prior few days had stirred the pristinely clear river into a cloudy mess, and all I could see were blurry flashes of white in the distance. After a few moments of straining to see, our guide offered to try another location. We zipped across to a shallow bank along the river and tried again.

This time, we got a clearer look. Still, I found myself frustrated with the images I was getting, and switched to more forgiving video instead. Our guide had suggested that the whales are attracted to vocalizations similar to their own, and so, face down in the water, floating in starfish position at the surface, we hummed high pitch songs; my tunes of choice were the soundtrack from The Little Mermaid.

Finally we moved to one last location where it appeared a feeding frenzy was taking place. Though I knew the whales were completely harmless and I was becoming more comfortable with each entry, I still felt a rush of awe and nerves slipping into the water so close to them. This time, there weren’t just a few whales passing us by at a time. They were in every direction, to every side of us, a swirling blur of blubber.

With a relatively stable population, few natural predators, and intelligent and social dispositions, the whales approached us freely. While I didn’t get as close as I have in encounters with, say, manta rays or manatees, it was intoxicating nonetheless.

In one moment, a particularly curious whale swam eye to eye with me for what my camera later told me was almost a full minute — it felt like ten. When he finally broke away, the one fellow snorkeler left in the water with me and I exchanged looks of shock and whooped into our snorkels. There were tears in my mask when we finally gave into the cold and crawled back onboard to the hot chocolate and warm cookies that awaited us.

It was one of the greatest animal encounters of my life.

Thinking of heading to Churchill yourself? Taking a course like could really help you get the most out of this experience, as could the course. As I diver I felt a little frustrated bobbing on the surface, and wished I’d  fulfilled my dream of taking a freediving course in preparation for this trip. There is no dive shop in Churchill and so diving there would require, at minimum, bringing filled tanks on the train from Winnipeg and chartering a private boat — freediving is a more accessible alternative.

In retrospect I also wish I’d tried taking my  underwater with me, as with its extender arm (the less shame-inducing moniker for a selfie stick) I could have gotten much more close-range shots, and with a smaller and less obtrusive camera than the I ended up shooting exclusively with underwater. In the future I may play around with attaching my extender arm to the underwater housing the of my Canon too, if it can handle the weight.

Basically, even as an experienced diver it took me a while to adjust to the conditions — cold water, low visibility, lots and lots of restrictive neoprene and, ya know, whales everywhere! — and I wish I had more time once I kind of got the hang of things. To make the most of your time with the whales, I recommend making yourself as comfortable as possible beforehand with both your camera and the equipment you’ll be using.

While I was fairly disappointed in my images aside from one or two, I was thrilled with my video! If you didn’t get the chance to watch when I posted this on Facebook last month, now’s your chance. (I recommend viewing in high definition by clicking the gear icon on the bottom right of the viewing window and checking the HD box.)

One of the best parts of this whole trip? I had 57,000 belugas nearly entirely to myself in the middle of peak season for spotting them. On the morning of my boat tour, we were one of two boats on the river. On the afternoon of my kayak adventure, there were seven kayaks in the water. On the morning of my snorkeling trip, just six of us slipped in the water. Summer tourism in Churchill hasn’t caught on the way bear season has, which just blows my mind. This trip sits firmly in the “hidden gem” category — at least for now.

And believe it or not, I didn’t even cover every beluga-meeting base. It wasn’t until I arrived in Churchill that I learned there’s yet another way you can meet belugas — by ! Not going to lie, I looked up how much it would be to change my flights for one more day in and on the Churchill River, stand up paddleboarding followed by one more snorkel session.

Unfortunately it was logistically impossible, but perhaps that’s for the best. I left Churchill with a burning fire lit in me to return again and spend more time with these majestic mammals of the sea, and it hasn’t quieted as time has passed. Belugas, I’ll be back.

Stay tuned for a post on my final wildlife encounters in Churchill!

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This post was written by me and brought to you by . Many thanks for for hosting me. I am a PADI Ambassadiver and regularly rave about all things diving. 

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48 Comments...
  • Amelie
    September 2 2016

    Wow I am jealous!
    If you like marine mammals the St. Lawrence river is full of them. You can also get great dives close to Tadoussac (province of Qc) -ideal for experimented divers. It is cold (dry suit almost mandatory) and the marine life is not as exotic as in Thailand, but you have whales. The Cote-Nord area is world-known for whale watching in summer time. Blue whales, Humpback whales, Belugas, sometimes orcas and even Groenland sharks. The place is called Les Escoumins. The water is around 4 degrees Celsius year long (yup, cold) and you can also do kayaking and I am pretty sure, some SUP. The landscape is scenic.
    Anyway, maybe an add on on your bucket list. 🙂

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      I’m SO sad I missed the season to swim with whales in Newfoundland — this is another great option to know about! Now that I have the Canada bug, this is definitely going on my list 🙂 Thanks Amelie!

  • Cate
    September 2 2016

    My dream has always been to see Polar bears, Belugas, and penguins! Thanks to living Vicarously through you, I literally squealed when I saw this post in my inbox. Those were amazing pictures, no matter the visibility. I would love to do the kayaking, I don’t know if I would be brave enough to snorkel though.
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    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      It took me a bit of courage to work up to but I’m so glad I did it! It helped knowing it was all psychological and we were completely safe at the hands of our guides.

  • Kathryn Allen
    September 2 2016

    LOVE the video, and every little thing about Churchill. What a magic speck of the world.

    The beauty and friendliness of the whales makes me wish that reverence for all species was a greater part of our culture.

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Indeed. Seeing firsthand the way the delicate ecosystem of Churchill is being ravaged by choices made in the rest of the world is sobering. I think all travelers who come here go home changed!

  • Nomadi
    September 2 2016

    Wow, amazing! We are heading to Churchill next summer (oh, why so far away…) and I absolutely cannot wait to see the whales! Thank you for sharing your experience!
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    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Oh, I’m so excited for you! Can I come? Ha ha but seriously… I want to go back already!

  • Kelly Russell
    September 2 2016

    Incredible!! So glad you got to experience this, and that you’ve created this outlet to share it with us. I’ve officially added this (and the polar bears) to my bucket list 🙂 thank you!

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Amazing Kelly! I’m excited for you already! But be warned it is addictive… I just added encounters with a million other species of whales to my own bucket list!

  • Janice
    September 2 2016

    Is it awful that i’ve read this post and seen your photographs of these beautiful creatures and the one thing I’m left thinking is “I’ve never seen Meihoukai in a coat before!”
    🙂
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    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Ha ha! Very true! The only other trip I can think of where I packed one was a summer trip to Iceland 🙂 If there was ever an attraction that could convince me to brave the cold, it’s getting in the water to see something magnificent!

  • Amanda
    September 2 2016

    So cool! They are by far the cutest whales out there. And I love that you sang Little Mermaid songs to them. When I swam with wild dolphins in New Zealand, they told us to make noises, too – it was the most hilarious thing to pop up above the water and listen to all the ridiculous sounds everyone was making through their snorkels!
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    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Oh my gosh yes! I couldn’t stop laughing at that… the guides must crack up. We sounded ridiculous.

  • Rachel
    September 2 2016

    Beautiful Meihoukai!!!!! I have absolutely loved your posts from this trip – the history, the nature, the food, All the things. I’m an American who frequently dreams about exotic places and one of the things I love about your blog is that you remind me there are such special places to see without even leaving North America. After seeing the whales and bears and remote arctic town, Canada is looking pretty darn exotic….so kudos on doing your job well.

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Thank you Rachel, that means a lot to me! I’m a huge proponent of “make the most of it” travel… make the most of the fact that your sister moved to a cool city, make the most of what’s accessible on a cheap and easy flight, make the most of a work trip by extending it for a few days. Obviously I treasure my big exotic trips but the ones a little closer to home are just as special.

  • Mary B
    September 2 2016

    I had tears in my eyes even before I got to the video – what an amazing experience you had! Thank you for sharing it. There’s something about these creatures that makes me want to be their best friend 🙂 Manitoba is officially on my wish list!
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    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Right?! I was like, take me with you, new whale friends! Accept me into your pod and we can swim together forever! Unfortunately, I got too cold before they could make up their minds.

  • Gemma Armit
    September 2 2016

    This is incredible! I wasn’t aware you could see them in Canada, they really are the strangest looking things. I’ve never dived in cold water, or been in a helicopter – could hit two challenges on the nose there!
    Gemma Armit recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Indeed! Some of the shots I have seen from summer helicopter tours in Churchill are really amazing — you can just see thousands of what look like little white rocks in the river… but the rocks are belugas!

  • Gail at Large
    September 2 2016

    As a former Manitoban, I am so ridiculously happy you had this experience in Manitoba. I have European friends who have visited Churchill to see polar bears, but this is the first time I’ve seen someone go there to see the belugas.

    Someone mentioned in an earlier comment about seeing belugas in the St. Lawrence River around Tadoussac, Quebec, and I second that vote. It’s a playground for nature lovers and another location in Canada that doesn’t get much exposure outside the country.
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    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      I admit I hadn’t heard of the St. Lawrence River but I’m so glad you guys introduced me… I’ve looked it up and it seems AMAZING!

  • Dominique
    September 2 2016

    Aww what an awesome experience! I have yet to meet all the fish and mammals of my dreams in the sea. Beluga whales weren’t on my list, but now they are! I don’t think you could’ve planned it any better!
    Dominique recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      No surprise here… this trip only inspired me to want to swim with MORE whales around the world 🙂 Now I’m dreaming of getting in the water with humpbacks, pilot whales, orcas… all of them!

  • Michelle
    September 2 2016

    So freaking cool!!!!

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Thanks, Michelle 🙂 And thanks for reading!

  • becky hutner
    September 2 2016

    Aw Meihoukai, they are SO. CUTE. We have never met in person but above all, this post has left me feeling so happy for you! It’s obvious how meaningful this experience was. Thank you as always for sharing your joy x

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      You’re so sweet Becky! Thank you! This was a really big bucket list kinda trip — and I cherished every minute.

  • Kassie
    September 3 2016

    This looks amazing! I think I would freak out at the idea of swimming in water where there may be orcas and polar bears but I would still do it for a chance to hang out with these beautiful whales! You’ve officially added another destination to my bucket list 🙂

    • Meihoukai
      September 3 2016

      Thankfully, orcas aren’t a concern here — the river is way too shallow for them to want to hang! And polar bears are so tightly tracked everywhere in the area surrounding Churchill, they guides would know before they got anywhere near the water.

  • Alaina
    September 3 2016

    THOSE WHALES! I had a similar experience with manatees in Florida, but this sounds absolutely magnificent!

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    • Meihoukai
      September 6 2016

      Yes I have too! Water was a tad warmer though, ha ha.

  • Marni
    September 4 2016

    Awesome!!! I love your pictures and video of being up close with the belugas. I’ve only had one chance to do a whale watching tour (pilot whales on a tour based around the Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia), and we weren’t in the water. This post has made me want to try one where I can get close to them.
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    • Meihoukai
      September 6 2016

      My one whale watching experience, in Iceland, was kind of a flop. We just didn’t see many, though I loved learning about them.

  • This is incredible! I didn’t realise that so many Beluga whales gathered there – that’s such an amazing opportunity. They have such friendly-looking faces, too! 🙂 And amazing that you got such close to them. Think I may just have to add this to my bucket list…
    Katie @ the tea break project recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      September 6 2016

      Do it! And seriously I’d recommend to do it soon. It’s amazing to me that there are so few people up there in the summer, and it feels really special to have it more or less to yourself.

  • Tammyonthemove
    September 6 2016

    What a stunning experience, although I would have been scared they flipped my kayak over. 🙂 beluga wales look so gentle. If looks like they are constantly smiling. ?
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    • Meihoukai
      September 9 2016

      It really does! Just the cutest little grin, ha ha. Such peaceful creatures.

  • Abe
    September 14 2016

    Wish I knew about them before. They are truly amazing creatures! Thanks for the great post.

  • Naomi
    September 18 2016

    Oh my god this is SO incredibly cool. I love that you saw them out in the wild and not just at an aquarium. Absolutely gorgeous shots as well. Stunning!
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    • Meihoukai
      September 22 2016

      I don’t know if I could appreciate seeing them in an aquarium after this. They are so majestic and beautiful in the wild.

  • Alicia
    September 18 2016

    I’ve been reading your blog for quite a while and absolutely love reading about your experiences. This little gem of a place sounds amazing. Thank you so much for sharing your life and adventures 🙂 I’m also from NY…all the way north on the Canadian border!

    • Meihoukai
      September 22 2016

      Nice! I was born and raised in Albany, so just three hours away 🙂

  • Kristin @ Camels & Chocolate
    September 19 2016

    I’ve never been as jealous as you as I am at this very moment reading about your beluga friends! Raffi made me a beluga fan FOR LYFE. And I didn’t even realize he was Canadian until I just Googled to make sure he is indeed still alive!
    Kristin @ Camels & Chocolate recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      September 22 2016

      I think we need to make this the next Kristin Meihoukai and Angie adventure? Although on second thought, Angie the Floridian might freeze…

  • Gally
    October 12 2016

    Amazing to swim with these lovelies.
    However, the question that we all want to ask is “Do you really own a winter coat??”!
    I think this is the first time/post I see you so equipped for the cold (although maybe I should check back Island!).
    Anyway, thanks for taking us along for the ride 🙂

    • Meihoukai
      October 15 2016

      All winter wear was courtesy of my mom 🙂 She was ever so kind to lend it to me!