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Martha’s Vineyard… on a budget? I admit, it doesn’t sound right. Like Thailand and good bread and cheese, or Brazil and being on time, or England and a reliably sunny weather forecast, it just doesn’t feel like a feasible travel combination.

But lean in, because I’m about to spill what feels like a major secret. The rumors aren’t true – Martha’s Vineyard isn’t an uber-exclusive, snobby haven reserved for only the insider elite. That’s Nantucket! (I kid, I kid – though there’s always been a friendly rivalry between the two islands.) First time visitors to the island are often surprised to find a thriving arts community, a strong agrarian culture, and a laid-back and barefoot feel.

Martha's Vineyard On a Budget

Martha’s Vineyard is expensive. But it’s also one of the most magical places in America, and this community-focused island, where humble houses still outnumber mega-mansions, is proud of its inclusive history of welcoming all. You could be next.

Admittedly, I have been blessed with the unique opportunity to fall in love with Martha’s Vineyard in a way most people don’t have access to – my family vacationed on the island nearly every summer when I was a girl, and my mom now lives seasonally in Oak Bluffs. I know from your comments and messages that many of you feel Martha’s Vineyard isn’t an accessible travel destination for you, and I’m hoping that the insider secrets and stories I’ll share here might convince you otherwise.

You’re not going to travel Martha’s Vineyard on a shoestring. But you also don’t need a private jet, a beach mansion or a Kennedy bank account to make it happen. Here’s a guide for those looking for something in between.

Martha's Vineyard On a Budget

When to Go

Timing is everything when it comes to planning a budget-friendly trip to the Vineyard. If you’re really on a shoestring, aim for anytime before Memorial Day at the end of May and after Labor Day at the beginning of September. If you have a bit more wiggle room in your budget, come between Memorial Day and the Fourth of July, when the weather is slightly warmer, the crowds are still manageable and prices not yet peak. Heart set on July and August? God bless you.

While July and August undoubtedly have the best beach weather with in the 80’s, June and September are still lovely, mostly hanging in the 70’s. Pushing further into the shoulder seasons, May and October are definitely sweater weather, with highs only in the 60s.

Choosing these off-peak times means not only will crowds be thinner and reservations of all sorts easier to come by, but accommodation prices will be significantly more manageable, and transportation will often be impressively discounted. And events like The in May and the in October prove there’s plenty going on outside peak season.

Martha's Vineyard On a Budget

Getting There

Martha’s Vineyard is an island, so eventually you’ll end up on a ferry or a flight in order to arrive.

First of all, don’t rule out air travel entirely. I’ve nabbed midweek JFK to MVY fares for a mere $75 before, and I’ve seen them as low as $60. Book early, fly off-peak, and travel off-season for your best bet at scoring similar fares. (Book at the wrong time and you’ll see fares of over a thousand bucks round trip from New York — for a 40 minute flight!)

Flights generally connect through New York and Boston. You can also fly via Washington DC, Nantucket, Hyannis, Providence, Westchester, New Bedford, White Plains – some only seasonally. Read more about how to generally find cheap airfare here.

Most frequently, however, budget travelers will travel by ferry. If you’re planning to bring your car onto the island, your only option is the Steamship Authority, which departs from Wood’s Hole, Massachusetts. Seasonal passenger ferries also leave from New York and New Jersey, from Quonset Point in Rhode Island (which you can connect to via Amtrak from New York), and from Nantucket, New Bedford, Falmouth, and Hyannis in Massachusetts. Learn more about the here — or just read on below.

Getting to Martha's Vineyard on a Budget

But back to the Steamship Authority from Wood’s Hole – because it’s by far the most budget friendly option at just $8.50 a pop each way. In contrast, the Seastreak Ferry from New York City is a cool $155 each way (and only runs in each direction once a week).

So now you have to get to Wood’s Hole. If you’ve decided to bring your car onto the island, you’re all set (more on that below in the Getting Around section). If not, you can still reach Wood’s Hole via your own vehicle, but you will have to pay to park it.

Parking in the Steamship Authority lots ranges from , depending on the distance of the lot. Frequent complimentary shuttles will bring you from your vehicle straight to the ferry. There’s no cheaper option – once, after hearing a rumor that Wal-Mart often for long-term parkers in its lots, my mom’s boyfriend tried calling the closest one on the Cape to see what the manager said (apparently they will tell you if they do allow it.) It’s not one of those locations.

But, if you’re staying on the Vineyard for more than seven days, feel free to lose your parking ticket. The maximum fee for a lost ticket is $105, which becomes the cheaper option after a week.

Another incredibly convenient option for reaching Woods Hole is the bus.  will delivery you straight to the dock from Boston’s South Station and Boston’s Logan Airport as well as New York, New York and Providence, Rhode Island. I’ve used Peter Pan to travel from Albany to Boston and Boston onto Wood’s Hole for $53 and it was a comfortable, seamless ride. If you find a cheap flight into Boston, it’s only $55 round trip from the airport to the ferry terminal and back – that’s cheaper than a one-way cab fare from the airport in some major cities.

Getting to Martha's Vineyard on a Budget

So while there are dozens of options for reaching Martha’s Vineyard, my favorite options are (1) to fly straight to the island, (2) fly to Boston and connect to the Peter Pan bus, or (3) drive or bus to Wood’s Hole.

Where to Stay

This is where the “ouch!” factor comes in — accommodation on Martha’s Vineyard is steep. But you don’t have to rent a $5,000 a week beach house to make it happen, obviously.

• The Martha’s Vineyard Family Campground

Not to be confused with the Campmeeting Association, commonly and confusingly referred to as “The Campground,” the is the one and only official place to pitch a tent. My mom, her boyfriend, his daughter and I all stayed here years ago before my mom became a part-time resident on the island (in fact, it was on that trip that we stumbled on our future home!) and I highly recommend this clean and organized option for those on a budget.

The Campground offers tent camping sites, RV and trailer hook-ups, and modest one and two bedroom cabins. All camp sites have picnic tables and fire pits and cabins come with a small grill. Shared bathrooms have hot water showers, and an on-site laundromat, playground, convenience store and rec room make this a one-stop shop for campers. There is a bus stop right at the campsite, which is located between Vineyard Haven and Oak Bluffs, and buses stop every 30 minutes. Bike rentals are also available and it’s a convenient way to reach both towns (we rode bikes to and from each so I could take photos for this post.) The biggest downside? You have to bring your own bedding.

The Martha’s Vineyard Family Campground is open from May 25th-October 11th for the 2017 season. There’s no maximum stay – you can post up for the whole summer, and many do! Two person tent sites start at $60 per night or $371 per night (there’s a discount for single campers outside of peak season.) Four person cabins start at $150 per night or $945 per week.

The Martha's Vineyard Family Campground

The Martha's Vineyard Family Campground

The Martha's Vineyard Family Campground

• Hostelling International Martha’s Vineyard

Yes, Martha’s Vineyard has a hostel! In fact, in 1955 it became the first purpose-built youth hostel (meaning it was built specifically to be a hostel) in the USA. Last summer, I stopped by to see what the Vineyard’s most affordable sleep was like.

The rural surroundings of the lend it the feel of a summer camp, as do the frequent bike tours, scout groups, and families that sometimes fill the sixty-seven beds spread across dorms and private rooms. Unlike many US hostels, this one is filled with primarily domestic travelers – as well as the occasional Europeans or more far-flung wanderers. The downside of the hostel is it’s somewhat remote location near the airport, though there is a bus stop directly in front of the hostel that will whisk you all over the island.

The Martha’s Vineyard hostel is open from May 20th-October 8th for the 2017 season. The maximum stay is one week. Dorm beds start at $38 per night, private rooms with shared bathrooms start at $82 per night. All rates include breakfast. Though I can’t give it a personal recommendation, my mom’s boyfriend’s daughter (whew!) stayed here with a bike tour and gave it two thumbs up. You can also read here.

HI Martha's Vineyard

HI Martha's Vineyard

HI Martha's Vineyard
HI Martha's Vineyard

• Hotels, Inns, Airbnbs and beyond

Believe it or not, there are plenty of small hotels, motels and locally owned inns that charge less than $100 a night – several of them can only be booked directly though and don’t have a huge online presence, so poke around. This is where the timing of your trip is huge. A room at the centrally located and charming starts at $99 a night midweek in May – and shoots up to $279 a night midweek in August – and is back down to $109 in September. Edgartown will generally fetch the highest accommodation costs.

Airbnb is also becoming popular on the island, with 19 listings currently available for under $100 a night, and 103 listings currently available for under $150. your first booking here!

Budget Accommodation Martha's Vineyard

Getting Around

If you are staying in the towns of Oak Bluffs, Vineyard Haven or Edgartown, chances are you will be in close walking distance to restaurants, shops, beaches, and other attractions. To get further afield, you have several options.

• Bus

Sure, you could get around the island on a pricey tour via trolley or van or brightly painted school bus. But you’ll be joined by just as many tourists – and plenty of locals! – on the public bus.

The buses on Martha’s Vineyard are reliable, efficient, and affordable, and reach every corner of the island in the summer season. If you’re staying down-island, there’s really no reason not to use them as your primary mode of transportation. There are bus stops at the airport and all major ferry terminals. Fares range from $1.25-$6.25 per ride, though one day passes are available for $8, three day passes for $18, and seven days for $30. Bring exact fare if you plan to purchase your pass or single ride on the bus directly.

Download the app to plan routes and track when the next bus is your way. And bonus! There are bike racks on most busses – so feel free to combine a long bike ride out to a destination with a relaxing bus ride back home.

Martha's Vineyard Bus System

Getting Around Martha's Vineyard on a Budget

• Bicycle

Martha’s Vineyard is a cycler’s paradise, covered in over seventy-five miles of dedicated trails. Find a map of the island’s . Also check Google Maps, which shows a bike option when you search for directions for the island! Even with a car on the island, I love the ride between Oak Bluffs and Vineyard Haven, and Oak Bluffs and Edgartown – no parking stress!

All passenger ferries allow bikes onboard for a modest fee, if you wish to bring your own. Rental companies in Vineyard Haven, Oak Bluffs, and Edgartown offer rentals starting at $22 a day or $95 a week – call around for the best rates.

Biking on Martha's Vineyard
Biking on Martha's Vineyard

• Cabs

Uber and Lyft are now available on Martha’s Vineyard – rejoice! Get a free ride of up to $20  with Uber, and up to $25 with Lyft . I always check the quote for both since it varies which is cheaper. If a heavy surge is happening, keep in mind that a local taxi may be cheaper – call one to ask. Already steep rates double from midnight to 7am, so if you really want to enjoy the local nightlife you might consider staying in Oak Bluffs or Edgartown.

If you’re on a budget, local cabs should be used quite sparingly – a bike or the bus are great alternatives.

• Your Own Vehicle

If you’re set on having your own set of wheels, start crunching numbers. Depending on where you’re coming from and how many days you’re staying, it might be most cost effective to bring over your own vehicle, if you have one, on the Steamship Authority ferry.

It costs $137 round trip, not including any passengers, and reservations are absolutely essential. Make a booking as early as possible – like, yesterday – though you may have more wiggle room traveling off-season. If the ferries are full, try for the waiting list. We usually wait list a reservation a couple times a year and often they come through. Fill up your tank before you arrive on the island to save on inflated gas prices.

If you’re planning to rent a vehicle on island, try calling around to local island agencies in addition to checking the usual big booking sites. Car rentals start at around $60-$85 a day. Mopeds are often pricier to rent than cars, rarely starting at less than $100 per day. Keep in mind that depending on the season, parking on the island can be extremely limited.

Getting Around Martha's Vineyard on a Budget

What To Do

This is the easiest area to save – the best things to do on Martha’s Vineyard are free or nearly so! Wandering the island’s six charming and distinctly different towns, and spreading out on its classic New England beaches, should be top of your list. Honestly, my happiest childhood memories of Martha’s Vineyard are of doing a whole lot of nothing – it’s a place you come to relax and recharge.

Yet here are a few other ideas for $5 and under:

• Jump off the infamous Jaws Bridge – or enjoy the spectacle of those who are crazy or brave enough to do so: Free

• Climb to the top of the , the , or the and admire the view: $5

• Ogle the Aquinnah Cliffs, a favorite local photo op: Free

Budget Things to Do on Martha's Vineyard

• Take a community yoga class at the beyond beautiful Yoga Barn: Free

• Make furry friends and check out a local farm at : $5

• Watch the sunset in Menemsha: Free (Plus the cost of whatever beach picnic you put together from local seafood shacks and the case of wine you brought to the island – no? Just me? Do like the locals do and bring a blanket and a beach chair and clap when the sun dips below the sea.)

• Ride the famed Flying Horses Carousel in Oak Bluffs: $2.50

Budget Things to Do on Martha's Vineyard

• Check out the galleries and weekly in West Tisbury: Free

• Work on your tennis swing on the local high school courts: Free

• Take photos of the colorful gingerbread houses of the : Free (Or pay $2 to visit the museum, or really splurge on $12 for of the neighborhood– my mom might be your tour guide!)

Budget Things to Do on Martha's Vineyard

And for $10 and under:

• Grab a hotdog and hit the stands to see local baseball team play: $7

• Tour the in Edgartown: $10 in the summer, $8 in the winter ($12 combo passes provide admission to both the museum and the Edgartown or Gay Head lighthouses.)

• Take an hour-long farm tour at or : $10 (cheese tasting and milking tours are also available for $20 at Grey)

• Ride your bike over to Chappaquiddick and tour the : $6 round trip for the short ferry ride across the sound with a bicycle, an attraction in and of itself, and the gardens are free.

Budget Things to Do on Martha's Vineyard

Where to Eat

No surprise here – bargain eats are hard to come by. If you’re traveling on a tight budget, staying in accommodation where you can cook many of your own meals (the hostel, the campground, or a rental with a kitchen) will be a huge boon. We always arrive on the island with a huge haul of groceries, which my mom reckons are about 20% cheaper on the mainland. You can supplement the basics with fresh produce from local up-island farms, often available at roadside stalls outside the entrances.

Eating in Martha's Vineyard on a Budget
Eating in Martha's Vineyard on a Budget

Yet even if you cook the majority of your meals, you can still get that “on vacation” feel splurging on casual treats like ice cream at (literally, a Martha’s Vineyard must), apple fritters at , or casual picnic eats like lobster rolls or clam chowder packed up for sunset.

Like most of the US, portions are huge in the Vineyard, so don’t be afraid to split an entrée if you do venture out for a splurge. Here’s a list of my favorite restaurants to do so at.

And here are a few other budget eat ideas:

• Seafood: On , you can get a massive lobster roll, chips, and a drink for $22. My mom says you get the best deal ordering them “unconstructed.” Available in season only, on Fridays from 4:30-7pm. Other affordable seafood favorites include in Vineyard Haven and in Menemsha.

• Picnic supplies: Grab sandwiches and other to-go treats from in West Tisbury, in Oak Bluffs and Edgartown, and in Oak Bluffs.

• Sit down specials: My beloved has 50 items under $10 on their menu (my go-to order of a pulled pork quesadilla is just $9.99, and I always have leftovers), the lunch specials at are a bargain (and the owners are Thai and couldn’t be sweeter), offers sit-down breakfasts at low-down prices, and the cheese and charcuterie boards (starting at $11.99) at brewery are more than worthy of a meal. The chef at my favorite restaurant on the island, Red Cat Kitchen, the bar menu at the casual local pub The Ritz – an amazing opportunity to try his creations at a fraction of the price.

. . . . . .

Bottom line? If you want to visit Martha’s Vineyard on a budget, you will probably have to compromise on something. If you love having the freedom of your own wheels, consider the hostel or campground. If you’d rather get cozy at a front and center inn, take the bus around. If you absolutely must visit in peak season, start pinning some fun summer recipes and planning some beach picnics.

That said, compromise tends to have a negative connotation, and in this case I don’t think it’s true – it’s really quite hard to do Martha’s Vineyard “wrong.” Come with a smile and regardless of how budget or bottomless your wallet might be, you’ll inevitably be swept up in the charm of — what one very biased blogger feels is, at least — one of the most magical islands in the world.

Any questions? Ask away! Are you a Vineyard regular who noticed something I missed? Feel free to add in the comments!

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44 Comments...
  • Dominique
    May 9 2017

    Ha, the silly foreigner here never realized that Martha’s Vineyard was that expensive to begin with. Halfway through you mentioned 5,000 USD beach houses and my jaw dropped! This is an incredibly helpful post in two ways: 1. it gives great budget tips 2. it ensures foreigners know what to expect and how to budget before they arrive at the destination 🙂
    Dominique recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Oh yes! The real estate section of Boston.com estimates that in Oak Bluffs, the average rental rage is $1,600 for a week at a small cottage, to $11,500 per week for a luxury home that sleeps eight. Edgartown is even more expensive!

  • Noel
    May 9 2017

    Thank you for this post, I love it! I haven’t been, but it has been on my list for years now. I much prefer to travel anywhere outside of peak season, so was thinking after Labor Day when all the kids go back to school would be perfect, and that was one of my main questions. I was more curious about how long restaurants and bars and other places stayed open after peak season. Sounds like until October is a safe bet, good to know!

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Hey Noel! Check out the post on my favorite restaurants that I linked to here — I list which restaurants are seasonal and which are year round. Most restaurants open at some point in May and close at some point in October.

  • Rachel
    May 9 2017

    That is an intense bridge jump photo – is that you?

    -Rachel @ Backcountry Petite

  • Cate
    May 9 2017

    I never knew Martha’s Vineyard could be so affordable!I was surprised there was a hostel there, though it looks lovely. Thanks for sharing!
    Cate recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Yeah! I was surprised by the hostel too — it was fun to drop by and tour it!

  • Megan
    May 9 2017

    I have loved MV ever since I discovered it 7 years go. I’ve only missed celebrating the 4th of July on MV once since then! It is absolutely my favorite place to see the fireworks! Thanks for writing such helpful guide! I’ll add for food: there are a hanful of spots that do $1 oyster nights or happy hours and if you’re itching for a lobster Menemsha is definitely the most cost-effective option. Our paths better cross on MV one of these years!
    Megan recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Awesome tips Megan! Admittedly I don’t eat seafood so my recommendations have only been gleaned from years of hosting and finding places to bring my lobster loving friends 😉 I would love a Martha’s Vineyard meetup!

  • Pilot Mark
    May 9 2017

    Great tips, Meihoukai! It´s always good to know that budget doesn’t always necessarily mean a compromise on quality. It seems like theres plenty to do on the island – the alpaca island definitely caught my attention!

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Indeed! It helps to start with a place where the best things to do are free 🙂

  • Janice
    May 10 2017

    Hi Meihoukai,
    I’ve only ever seen it in the movies and have always thought of it as an exclusive and expensive place that I wouldn’t be able to afford to visit. Well you’ve changed that! Fantastic post. And Jaws bridge is here!!! Who knew!

    • Sara
      May 10 2017

      Much of the movie was filmed on Martha’s Vineyard, and the remains of the Jaws boat itself can be seen on the banks of Menemsha Pond (up-island between Chilmark and Aquinnah)!

      • Meihoukai
        May 12 2017

        There’s a great Jaws tour too, in Edgartown! I took it last year and had a blast!

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Yay! So happy I can help to change that misconception in a small way. I adore this island and definitely want to share the love!

  • What a lovely review Meihoukai, and how very detailed. ‘Love it!

    I’m another foreigner who has heard of Martha’s Vineyard, but has absolutely no idea where it is!

    I’ve checked it now and discover it’s in New England! I’ve not yet been to that part of America, but when I do, I’ll probably use your guide to visit. And sadly, it would probably be in the summer ‘cos of the very entitled boy-child at home. #onlychildsyndrome!
    Victoria @The British Berliner recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Ha! Well, it is certainly at its most lively in the summer 🙂 You won’t regret a visit at any time!

  • Elizabeth Howell
    May 10 2017

    Love the pic jumping off the Jaws bridge!
    Elizabeth Howell recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Ha, thanks! That’s an old photo — but I do it every year!

  • becky hutner
    May 10 2017

    ALEX! This post actually made my day. I always read your Martha’s Vineyard coverage (and Ko Tao. And all other island & diving posts) with a tinge of sadness because I’ve assumed as a travel destination, it was unavailable to me. Not for budget reasons, but for health reasons! Say what? I try not to dwell on this disappointing (heart breaking, soul destroying) aspect of my life but basically, I was struck with a rare medical condition 3 years ago that among other things, puts boat travel & most water-based activities out of bounds, for good! Your worst nightmare I know & plenty awful for me too. So how exciting to learn that you can get to MV BY AIR!!! I am seriously over the moon & already scheming a family trip there next year for my mother’s 70th. I think it would be so perfect!

    Thank you thank you for this inadvertent bit of good news. & if we ever do meet – and I hope we do! – I will explain all over a (very) stiff cocktail x

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Aw, this makes me so happy Becky! Not about your illness, of course, which I am sorry to hear about… I know you’ve mentioned them before. I didn’t know this detail though, I can’t imagine.

      But I am happy that YOU GET TO COME TO MV! Would love to help you plan a trip. You could combine it with Nantucket too!

  • Ijana Loss
    May 10 2017

    I want to visit!! A good island is something special, there’s not really a way to replicate the feeling anywhere else. I’m a lover of cold weather so usually that works perfectly in my favor when visiting places in shoulder season, so I gotta plan a trip!

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      That would be great! I can’t say I agree with you there, lol, but I DO love Martha’s Vineyard in May and September!

  • Sara
    May 10 2017

    One little tip — the bus will almost always be willing to drop you off/pick you up wherever you want along its route, so you don’t have to make it to the exact stop!

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Yes! So true Sara. And the drivers are so friendly, in general!

      • Sara
        May 12 2017

        They’re the best! I was working at the Chilmark store one summer and taking the bus to work, and a driver recognized me and gave me a bunch of passes for free! ?

        • Meihoukai
          May 12 2017

          Aw, that is so sweet! What a guy… or gal!

  • Awesome tips, Meihoukai! I visit MV on a yearly basis, always in the shoulder season. I can attest to the hostel and the bus system being key to keeping my visits cheap. I’d also suggest trying a stuffed quahog and a cup of New England clam chowder while visiting! They are cheap and filling snacks to have while out exploring.
    Brittany Quaglieri | Transformed Thru Travel recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Awesome to hear a testimonial from someone who has been there and done that Brittany! Kudos on making it a regular budget adventure!

  • Marni
    May 10 2017

    I’ll admit this is the first time I’ve really felt that visiting Martha’s Vineyard could be an actual possibility! This is a great post, and thank you for taking the time to research and go through each option so thoroughly. If I ever make it out that way, I’ll definitely be referring to this post.
    Marni recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Yay, that makes me so happy to read! That’s exactly what I was hoping for — I want young and budget travel lovers to know it’s not entirely outside their reach.

  • Traci
    May 10 2017

    I love these types of step-by-step posts. Thank you so much! We are headed to Boston in June and are contemplating a day trip to Nantucket… I may add Martha’s Vineyard to our potential list, too!

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Do it, Traci! I have a few more Martha’s Vineyards posts coming up that will hopefully push you over the edge 😉

  • Kate Storm
    May 11 2017

    I love this post! Your New England coverage is coming at the perfect time for me–I’m spending significant time in the region for the first time this summer, and yes, Martha’s Vineyard is totally on the list.
    Kate Storm recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      May 12 2017

      Yes yes yes! I can’t wait to read about it… please go!

  • I’m ready to go back for round two! Maybe our summer 2018 meet-up? 😉
    Kristin @ Camels & Chocolate recently posted..

  • Kristin
    July 13 2017

    Searched back to find this guide! Booked a spontaneous camping trip to MV next weekend w/ bicycles only! Looking forward to hitting your recommended places to see and eat! Thanks for all the awesome intel!

    • Meihoukai
      July 17 2017

      Oh yay Kristin! That’s so exciting — tell me if you write about the trip so I can give it a read!

      • Kristin
        August 7 2017

        I got my blog post out last week! I would love if you could read it and had any feedback 🙂

  • Christy
    July 25 2017

    Hi, I can’t thank you enough for posting on Martha’s Vineyard. It’s been a place I dream of going. My high school girlfriends and I are considering going together this fall. Looks like we have the first or second weekend of October. Is that too late. Will that be OK?

    • Meihoukai
      July 30 2017

      Yay! That makes me happy Christy. Obviously in October there’s no beach weather and some of the restaurants will be closed for the season. But you’ll find great prices! I’d aim for the first weekend if possible. Enjoy!