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There is a well trodden route through Cambodia for most travelers. The vast majority make a bee-line across the country, hitting only Phnom Penh, the capital, and Siem Reap, base for visiting the Angkor temples, along the way. Those with a bit more time on their hands might drop into Sihanoukville, the tourism capital of the coast. Those who are deliciously rich in time might choose to visit more overlooked destinations, such as Battambang.

Battambang

Though Battambang may appear as a sleepy town to visitors, it is actually Cambodia’s second largest city with over 250,000 residents. The travelers that do make the 5 hour journey from Siem Reap to visit come for the well preserved french architecture, the laid back vibe, and the city’s claim to fame, riding the so-called bamboo train. We too, were drawn by this so called train, and decided to make a two night stop in Battambang between Siem Reap and Phnom Penh.

Battambang

 

The Battambang Circus

Our first stop after dropping our bags at a cheap and clean $7 a night hotel was to make our way to Battambang’s second most famous attraction, the circus at . PPS is an organization dedicated to using art to help children with both their physical and emotional needs. One of their main fundraisers is a circus put on by program leaders and students. The $8 admission fee for the circus goes straight to supporting the center’s many schools, programs and services. Having only heard about the circus via word-of-mouth, we had no idea what to expect.

Battambang Circus

We arrived after dark to what looked like a rural summer camp, with the exception of a big top tent in the middle of a field. We peeked at some of the center’s other exhibitions showing off student art, but quickly shuffled into the tent to get a seat. Good thing, too, because soon the bleachers were filled with excited local kids and families, and a few other foreign tourists.

Battambang Circus

The show started off with a concert featuring the usual suspects: guitar, drums, etc. but also a row of local instruments I had never seen nor heard before. After the concert the real show began, featuring juggling, drama, and acrobatics. The best part was hearing the local kids go wild in the audience.

Battambang Circus

Here’s a short video clip of the show:

Show are held only twice a week, so be sure to check out when planning a trip to Battambang. When else are you going to be able to help disadvantaged children by attending a Cambodian circus?

 

The Bamboo Train

The next day, we hired a local guide and tuk tuk driver, Mr. Han Houn, to bring us around Battambang. Our first stop was the famous bamboo train. For years, in-the-know travelers have been urging other to “go while you still can” as local authorities threaten to stop foreigners from riding the tracks.

Bamboo Train Battambang

However, when we arrived it seemed the police were running the show as they handled all the money from our $5 entry to the tracks and even happily snapped a photo for us.

Battambang Bamboo Train

The bamboo train is ultra light and constructed from bamboo, steel, and a tiny generator that provided power, directed by our driver. It barrels down the tracks at a whopping 25 mph.

Bamboo Train Battambang

Years ago, there was a train network built by the French that stretched across the entire country, from the Thai border to Vietnam. Then, the Khmer Rouge happened. Trains were ambushed and tracks were heavily mined and still today, the government can’t guarantee that certain parts of the track are even cleared of UXO. What is left are the norries. Though now mainly a tourist attraction, the tracks are also used by locals for long distance journeys and cargo transit.

Bamboo Train Battambang

The train rattles and rocks on the tracks as it steams past. The most white-knuckled bit, however, is when another train approaches. The rules of the track state that whichever train has the lightest load must hop off the train and disassemble. The drivers are ninjas at this process and can go from moving full speed to disassembled at the side of the tracks in 5 minutes flat.

Bamboo Train Battambang

This is the perfect opportunity to have a countryside photo shoot with your girlfriends. Perhaps I should submit to Vogue?

Bamboo Train Battambang

Other cars weren’t the only things on the track. Local people walked along the tracks, and livestock was often found grazing there as well.

Bamboo Train Battambang

At the end of the line, we stopped at a small village. We were expected to buy a soda or a snack, but it was well worth it for the company of the sweet kids and families we sat and shared a drink with.

Bamboo Train Battambang

The kids made us jewelry gifts out of grass blades and played games with us. It was so refreshing to hang out with children not trying to sell us something or ask us for money.

Bamboo Train Battambang

Bamboo Train Battambang

Bamboo Train Battambang

As we left they asked us to sign a cardboard guest book and it was so sweet to read the messages from other travelers. Our message may or may not have made reference to the , which somehow became the unofficial anthem of our trip to Cambodia.

Bamboo Train Battambang

We rode back in silence, contemplating the beauty of the countryside and the unique experience we were having. Already I was glad that we had made the detour to Battambang, and our day wasn’t even half over.

Bamboo Train Battambang

Stay tuned for Part II of our weekend in Battambang…

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14 Comments...
  • Kathryn
    November 23 2011

    Wow, Meihoukai, something about this has me in tears. What a beautiful experience you had, despite the sadness that I know you feel about the hardships the Cambodian people have endured. I feel you’ve taken me to a place so few Westerners have experienced…I NEED to come to Cambodia!

    • Meihoukai
      November 24 2011

      Yes, lets come back together! I can’t get enough of this place. I’m glad the excitement of my post has come through 🙂

  • Roy
    November 23 2011

    A bamboo train! Amazing! I can’t wait to read part two.

    • Meihoukai
      November 24 2011

      It was amazing! Part II coming up tomorrow….

  • Chris
    November 23 2011

    Ugh!! This article reminded me how upset I was for leaving Cambodia earlier than I wanted to. Definitely going back tho, want to see all these places and volunteer outside Phnom Penh.

    • Meihoukai
      November 24 2011

      Just wait until you read about the islands! If you didn’t make it there during your trip, you should hurry back soon!

  • Sarah
    November 24 2011

    I’m pretty sure you already know my thoughts on Battambang but seriously, what an AMAZING place!

    Those kids were such a treat to hang out with. Spiderman-shirt-girl tried to convince me she used to live on the moon but moved to Cambodia because she “likes it hot.” Pure hilarity.

    • Meihoukai
      November 24 2011

      Haha. Similar reasons for why I left New York for South East Asia…

  • Sovanna
    December 16 2011

    Battambang is my homeland, great to see you write something about this place 😀 Nice post

    • Meihoukai
      December 16 2011

      Thanks Sovanna! I’m glad you enjoyed it… must be cool to see a post about your hometown. Not many people write much about Albany, New York, which is where I’m from 🙂

  • liz
    April 3 2012

    I did the bamboo train ride about a month ago. I met the kids shown in the pics. They were so cute and friendly. I remember especially the girl from the fourth pic starting from bottom cause I played and chatted with her for a while. Only I thought it was very sad that they lived in such poor conditions. Hope they’re doing well.

    • Meihoukai
      April 4 2012

      Hi Liz, thanks for your comment! I agree, it can be difficult to see the conditions that some children live in in Cambodia. However, these girls seem clean and well-fed and have a very protective mother… I mean to say that I think they will be okay in the long run. They certainly have great personalities and are learning English from all their conversations with travelers!

  • Khmer Sor
    March 13 2014

    Hi, some nice looking pictures!

    • Meihoukai
      March 13 2014

      Thank you! Cambodia really stole my heart, it’s a beautiful country 🙂