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This might be the post I’ve been most excited to write from my entire six weeks in Guatemala — it’s also, fittingly, the last, which is usually what the best is saved for. Why am I so animated over this one? Well, Guatemala City doesn’t have much of a reputation among travelers. Most, in fact, don’t spent a single night here unless forced to by a flight. Like most Central America capitals (Panama City being the one exception), Guatemala City is considered entirely skippable.

I don’t blame anyone for thinking so — I know I would have happily breezed by were it not for three of my close friends from Brooklyn spending several months on an in the city’s lively Zone Cuatro.

Guatemala City Zone Four

Guatemala City Zone Four

Guatemala City Zone Four

After our weekend away in Monterrico earlier in my trip, I’d returned with Steffi, Sam and Mary to Guatemala City for one night before moving onward back to Antigua. We arrived in the evening and I left in the morning, but one night in their funky communal living compound had me itching to go back and explore more. And so later, after a week spent in the fairly rural outposts of Livingston, Rio Dulce, and Lanquin, I was ready for some big city action — not to mention some big hugs from old friends.

I wasn’t expecting much more than quality time with my nearest and dearest out of Guatemala City. After all, it’s a sprawling concrete metropolis that doesn’t even come close to making it onto the Gringo Trail. As , always generous to the underdog, quips, “depending on who you talk to, Guatemala City is either big, dirty, dangerous and utterly forgettable or big, dirty, dangerous and fascinating.” I was about to be surprised by the fascinating side.

Guatemala City Street Art

Guatemala City Street Art

Guatemala City Street Art

Zona Cuatro, or Zone Four, was my home base. The city is broken into various zones, each with a distinct personality. Zona Cuatro is kind of the Brooklyn of Guatemala City — filled with street art, chic cafes, trendy design studios, bohemian restaurants, and communal workspaces for young entrepreneurs.

It was the perfect place for a wander. While Sam admitted that there’d been a recent daytime mugging only blocks away, this sector of the city felt no more or less dangerous than anywhere else I’d been in Guatemala, and I felt comfortable carrying my (admittedly old and practically defunct) dSLR around in my bag.

Guatemala City Graffiti

Guatemala City Graffiti

Cafe Despierto Guatemala City

Guatemala City Zone Four

I admit that I was totally spoiled by healthy meals cooked by my fabulous friends for the vast majority of the time I was in Guatemala City. The living and working space they were based in was shared by artists, architects, and NGO workers from Guatemala and beyond, and I loved getting to know them over mealtime. Seriously, after months of eating in restaurant nothing feels quite as luxurious as eating a homemade dinner in the kitchen in your sweatpants while drinking wine out of a plastic cup. Travel does funny things to one’s perspective on life.

But that said, we did get to try out some great restaurants in Guatemala City. Fresh squeezed orange juice and cold coconuts were frequent splurges on the street, and , , and were three Zona Cuatro favorites.

Street Food Guatemala City

Caminito Guatemala City

Caminito Guatemala City

Caminito Guatemala City

Zona Cuatro is also home to Centro Cívico, home to the country’s Supreme Court and other official buildings. I loved walking through this district as it reminded me so strongly of my hometown of Albany, New York, and their distinctive shared architectural style. In fact, I posted a photo on of this area and a friend from home commented that at first glance they thought I’d come home early.

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

It was also the perfect setting for an impromptu photoshoot. But where isn’t, with these two?

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

Palacio de Justicia Guatemala City

One afternoon we headed to Zone Ten, where we ran some errands, marveled at a Guatemalan mega-mall, and checked out the Guat City location of , the salad and juice bar I’d become so enamored with in Antigua. Zone Ten is the ritziest and most modern sector of Guatemala City and there are American-style chains around every corner, so this organic and original outpost was quite a treat. We all joked that my buying lunch constituted my turn in the kitchen but ha ha we weren’t kidding these guys have literally tried my cooking.

It’s really better that I just leave those sorts of things to the professionals.

Pitaya Guatemala City

Pitaya Guatemala City

Pitaya Guatemala City

Zone Ten Guatemala City

The final zone — of interest to travelers, anyway — that we had left to conquer was Zone One, the historic center of the city. Here we browsed through markets for fresh produce, dipped into a , snacked on street food and checked out an art exhibit in the Parque Central. Before I move on, a note on Megapacas — these are Guatemala’s crazy cheap version of the Salvation Army, and I scooped up some beautiful new things for just a few bucks a piece. ? Two dollars. ? Three! They are all over the country and are also a great place to nab a few warmer pieces if you’re caught off guard by Antigua‘s chillier temperatures, for example. Saying I’m not much of a shopper is kind of an understatement, but even I couldn’t resist the allure of the Guatemala City Megapaca.

Once we were loaded up on old clothes, it was time to get some culture on…

Zone One Guatemala City

Parque Central Guatemala City

Nothing makes a bunch of art school survivors as giddy as a big public art installation, so we were thrilled to explore the exhibit housed in the Parque Central. The installation was a beautiful blend of modern and historic, and I loved seeing work from Guatemala City’s most celebrated artists displayed inside of it.

Parque Central Guatemala City