Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01

There’s more to Cairo than the pyramids.

I’m sure some of you are like, um, duh, and others of you, like me fairly recently, are leaning in whispering, “tell me more.” The truth is that when I first started planning my trip to Egypt, I was clueless! It wasn’t a country I had any base level of practical knowledge about, so I started from scratch with all of it. As usual, you guys were my absolute best resource for advice and ideas.

So first of all, the pyramids are technically in a city called Giza, though for all intensive traveler purposes, you can explore both from either. But don’t just tick off those three pointy piles of rubble and run off (now I’m just trying to make sure their ‘ol pyramid egos don’t get too big). Cairo has some pretty spectacular urban sights that deserve at least a day on your Egypt itinerary.

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

First up? The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, also often referred to as the Egyptian Museum, an absolute must-see even for the non-exhibition lovers among us. Shannon, Sam and I made plans to kick off another day of sightseeing at the museum, and as I was coming from the far-flung neighborhood of Maadi, I decided to tack on an extra adventure and use the Cairo Metro to get there.

Using public transportation in a new city where you don’t speak the language can be intimidating, but I was armed with small change, the name of the station I wanted to end up at (Sadat, for anyone making the same journey!) and a smile.

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

When I approached the ticket window at my local station, I smiled, said hello in Arabic, and said the name of the station. The seller replied in English that I needed to go to the other side of the tracks, which was super helpful. I went through a metal detector and my bag through a scanner, and then crossed over to the correct side of the station. I’d read there was a carriage for women only, and when the train arrived it was very clearly marked as such. While the carriages aren’t air-conditioned and got pretty steamy, it was otherwise a safe, efficient and simple way to get around Cairo! As a woman traveling alone, I felt totally comfortable. Best part? It cost 2EGP — or about eleven cents.

And it dropped me pretty much at the door of the Egyptian Museum.

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Despite housing what are arguably some of the world’s most impressive artifacts, the museum is surprisingly ramshackle. There’s no MOMA-like gift shop, no swank cafe (in fact, no cafe at all) and a shocking lack of guard rails or ropes around what seem like some very precious relics.

Frankly, I wasn’t surprised when I later learned that there are not one but two new facilities being built — though the building itself is so grand and historic I hope they find some appropriate way to memorialize it, too.

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

A few pieces of advice for anyone who may be Cairo-bound, someday: In Egypt, separate camera tickets are issued at most of the major sites. Of course, I bought the camera ticket at the museum (for 50EGP, or $2.80US), and texted Shannon that I’d happily share my museum photos with her so she didn’t have to buy one too. But when she entered the museum, they saw her camera inside her bag through the scanner and wouldn’t allow her in the museum without the camera ticket. So leave the camera behind or get ready to pay up.

Another thing to note — I still have a student ID (thanks for not dating those bad boys, Pratt!) and whenever I remember, I tend to whip it out for discounts, mostly out of habit. Never has it ever been a big deal… until I got to Egypt. The guy who sold me the Egyptian Museum and Royal Mummy Halls combo ticket (for 120EGP, or $6.70US) barely raised an eyebrow, but I then had to show it three more times within the museum, and twice the ticket-takers looked at me with the disappointment and disgust of someone who had personally stolen their paycheck and spent it on fruit-shaped pool floats before interrogating me on everything from my age to what I was studying. I was so flustered by the whole thing I vowed not to use my student ID again in Egypt, and the more I thought about it, the more I realized I’m past that stage. I’m not an ultra budget traveler just scraping by anymore — I can afford full price admission and I should pay it. But anyway, student ID holders, be ready for an interrogation!

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

By the time we’d waited in line twice (to get Shannon’s camera ticket), dealt with my age interrogator (I mean, how did they know I wasn’t a grad student!) and finally gotten to the galleries, we realized that all the guides for hire were outside the museum. We weren’t going back there again. I actually think this would be a really interesting place to hire one, but we had fun just wandering and reading too.

My highlights were the contents of King Tutankhamun’s tomb — of which no photographs were allowed, even with the photo ticket — and the grand hall of the building itself. My lowlight? The Royal Mummies Hall! I didn’t even consider not buying the upgraded ticket when we were at the admissions booth, but in reality I walked right in, realized that I was looking at actual, shrunken little dead people, felt an overwhelming wave of nausea, and told Shannon and Sam I’d wait outside. I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me that we’d be creeping on actual corpses, but I was so rattled! Luckily there’s no photos allowed in there, either.

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Egyptian Museum of Cairo

Next up? A lunch disaster of epic proportions. Every traveler will have a story like it, eventually: we Uber-ed to what we thought was , sat down already starving, placed an obscenely large order, and sat back chatting and laughing while we waited for it to appear. We were caught up in conversation and also trying to be chill, but as time went on we couldn’t help but notice not even our drinks had appeared.

After a long, laborious translation provided by another customer, we realized that half the order was being delivered from some sort of sister restaurant somewhere, and the other half was just never really placed… including our 2.5 beverages per person. At this point, over an hour had passed and various levels of hanger, chaos, and desperation had set it, so we abandoned ship. It was a dark time.

Sam had had enough and bid us adieu in favor of finding some real food. It being our last day together, Shannon and I rallied — and by rallied I mean I marched us into McDonald’s, got us some french fries and some fountain soda, and stuffed us in another Uber to continue on with our day and pretend that whole unpleasant mess never happened.

Exploring Cairo's Islamic Quarter

Exploring Cairo's Islamic Quarter

Our destination? Islamic Cairo, a historic quarter of the city known for mosques, markets, and the distinct sensation of going back in time.

Exploring Cairo's Islamic Quarter

Exploring Cairo's Islamic Quarter

We didn’t have a particular destination in mind, aside from the famed Khan El Khalili market. So we wandered around some backstreets that based on the reception we got, were definitely no main thoroughfare for tourists.

Twice we passed conservatively dressed families who whispered among themselves before stuffing a baby in my arms and taking a flurry of photos of us together, then shyly slinking away. “You’re like the president!” joked Shannon, encouraging me to give the babes a peck. I was so flustered by the whole thing I didn’t think to ask to take a photo of mine until it was too late!

Exploring Cairo's Islamic Quarter

Exploring Cairo's Islamic Quarter

Eventually we wound our way around to the market, which I have to admit was much more impressive than I’d expected. I braced myself for aisles of kitschy tourist crap, but we found an authentic, Aladdin-like bazaar with authentic crafts and art, narrow streets lined by cafés where locals puffed on shisha, and so many things we were tempted to buy!

My backpack was already bursting yet I couldn’t help myself from adding a few little gems…

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Eventually, as we reached the outer edges of the market, the tourist trinkets featured more prominently, and we decided to give one last attempt at visiting a mosque — Shannon had never been to one — before we headed to Shannon’s hotel happy hour in Zamalek. We’d been overwhelmed by the “helpful” people claiming the mosque we’d wanted to visit was closed — a common scam we both knew well from the Grand Palace in Bangkok — and had fled rather than try to suss out the truth.

Heading back in, we were really still not in fine battle form — exhausted from a long day and still no savvier to what we were actually attempting to do. So when a friendly man promised to walk us to a different mosque with a beautiful view, we kind of willingly succumbed to being scammed. What the heck, right.

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Khan El Khalili Market, Cairo

Islamic Cairo Guide Travel Blog

In the end, it was fo sho a scam — we payed a ridiculous sum of 100EGP, or $5.70, to be led up a back staircase to a secret rooftop, and then were later pressured to tip on top of that, which I replied to with a friendly laugh. All in all, it wasn’t a terrible deal — we never would have found the place on our own, and the views were gorgeous.

Sometimes, getting scammed ain’t so bad.

Islamic Cairo Guide Travel Blog

Islamic Cairo Guide Travel Blog

Islamic Cairo Guide Travel Blog

Shannon, Sam and I had planned to toast to our time together in Cairo with a big night out on the town. We were so excited… until we realized it was a major Muslim holiday and no alcohol was being sold. Whoops!

We managed to talk ourselves into a reservation at for a fancy booze-free dinner instead. Even without a cocktail in hand, it’s impossible to imagine there’s a more beautiful restaurant in all of Cairo. Seriously — don’t miss it.

Sequoia, Cairo

So, Cairo was a whirlwind! I still technically had a bit more time there as the first stop on my tour of mainland Egypt with Travel Talk Tours — coverage starting next week! — but my chapter of exploring Cairo on my own was coming to a close.

I feel I can’t conclude this post without answering the question I was most asked. Was it safe? Was I comfortable traveling on my own? Overall, I only had a few days to sample from, but I was pleasantly surprised with how comfortable I felt and how manageable the attention levels were. When I walked around Maadi and other non-touristy areas, I literally didn’t garner a second glance. We did get a lot of stares in Islamic Cairo and a lot of sales pressure at the pyramids, but neither was overwhelming.

Taking the metro and taking Ubers both felt like safe options for getting around, and I loved being able to consult with my female Airbnb hosts about various moves before making them. I’ll definitely continue to address this throughout my Egypt coverage, but I left Cairo feeling confident that I was taking a tour not because I needed to, but because I wanted to! And that was a great feeling.

Islamic Cairo Guide Travel Blog

Islamic Cairo Guide Travel Blog

Next stop… exploring mainland Egypt with Travel Talk Tours!

3-devide-lines
YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY
28 Comments...
  • Lisa
    June 1 2018

    Bravo…as always…informative, funny and lots of eye candy. Your photos are amazing…makes me think I need to get a ‘real’ camera and upgrade from my phone.
    Can’t wait to follow in your footsteps in September!!! I’m even more excited now. Maybe I can find the scam guy to get me to the roof top view. 😍
    Thank you!

    • Meihoukai
      June 14 2018

      Ha, believe me, you’ll find some scam guys 😉 Just show them one of those photos — I’m sure they’ll bring you right to the same spot!

      • Lisa
        June 15 2018

        Ha ha…will do!!!
        Thanks for making me even more excited about my trip!

  • Ramona
    June 2 2018

    Great pictures! I’m glad you had a good trip.

  • kate
    June 2 2018

    I love your blog! I enjoyed hearing about your time in Cairo. I am taking the Travel Talk Tour of Egypt/Jordan in October and can’t wait to hear those details as well!

  • Dave
    June 3 2018

    Let’s go back to Egypt next year after Midburn. 😉

  • Dominique
    June 3 2018

    The souq in Cairo actually looks much better than I had expected it to. Usually, you do expect touristic trinkets, it’s good to see there are some real souqs out there 🙂
    Dominique recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      June 14 2018

      Agreed! I was like eh whatever markets ho hum. But DANG this one made me feel like I was in Aladdin!

  • Kendal Karstens
    June 4 2018

    I’m trying to convince a friend to travel to Egypt with me over Christmas with a tour group. I’m not anymore concerned about safety in Egypt than any other country I’ve traveled to. Obviously we’d avoid the Sinai Peninsula and other tremulous areas. She believes, after some online research, that it’s not worth it to travel to Egypt due to terrorism and political rife. I don’t want to push her outside her comfort level, but I believe she’d miss out on a great opportunity/experience if she didn’t go. Any advice on how to convince her?

    • Meihoukai
      June 14 2018

      Hey Kendal! Well, I did end up doing a group tour for part of my Egypt trip — you can read about it here — and also did some independent travel, including to the Sinai peninsula.

      I’d say you can show her my blog posts 🙂 Honestly when someone has it in their head that a destination is dangerous, it can definitely be tough to convince them otherwise. Personally I used the UK’s Travel Advisory page to research, which I found far more than the US’s (it has color-coded regions, rather than just issuing blanket country-wide statements.) If she’s not keen though, I say join a group tour and go for it solo! That’s what I did and I had an incredible time. If you push her to come and she’s on edge, you might spend the trip stressed too, ya know?

  • Amy M
    June 4 2018

    I’m loving the egyptian coverage of your posts – so lovely to see so many bloggers going and staying past the pyramids! x

    • Meihoukai
      June 14 2018

      Thanks Amy! Oh man, there’s SO MUCH to see past the pyramids!

  • Jessica
    June 5 2018

    Great tips on traveling in Cairo!

    I would love to go to Egypt one day, if I can convince anyone to come with me.

    • Meihoukai
      June 14 2018

      Why not join a group tour? That’s what I did, and I found it a great way to share the experience with others even though technically I arrived in Egypt alone 🙂

  • Ijana Loss
    June 5 2018

    Wow, I’ve never really known or cared much about Cairo, but now it actually seems pretty cool, thanks for educating us! I am totally with you on that mummy exhibit thing lol, no way I would go in there XD

    • Meihoukai
      June 14 2018

      I was like… HOW DID I NOT THINK THIS THROUGH!? Ha it was nasty!

  • Cori
    June 6 2018

    Very cool! I like the museum photos. After visiting multiple Egyptian themed exhibits it seems standard to exhibit large Egyptian statues without any barriers. My guess is that the typical materials used (hard stones and metals) to sculpt the statues are stable enough to endure the occasional touch by handsy visitors.

  • Kacy
    June 15 2018

    Wow what an adventure! The baby thing is bizarre!

    I’ve honestly never thought that much about traveling to Cairo, but now that you’ve planted the seed I can’t stop thinking about it.
    Kacy recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      June 18 2018

      Stay tuned for some Egypt announcements coming up soon 😉 I love that I’ve planted this seed!

  • Marni
    June 28 2018

    Would you promise not to judge me if I admitted the first time I heard of/became interested in the Egyptian museum was thanks to the movie The Mummy (lol)? It looks like a truly fascinating museum and I’m all about anything Ancient Egypt related. I’m thrilled you explored more in the area – it’s nice to hear about some local-esque options (like the metro). Great post!
    Marni recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      July 5 2018

      No judgement at all! I think based on talking to my tour group, The Mummy brings a lot of people to Egypt 😛 And hey, the movie The Beach brought me to Thailand!

  • Kacy Kish
    August 17 2018

    I just caught up on all your Egypt posts and I’m obsessed. I recently found out I’ll have the opportunity to go next year and I’m freaking out about how cool it’s going to be!
    Kacy Kish recently posted..

    • Meihoukai
      October 10 2018

      Oh my gosh that’s so exciting! What where when why? Ha. I already want to go back!

  • Kailey
    November 3 2018

    Ik you mentioned your accidental drone smuggling, so i was wondering if you could tell me a bit more about airport arrival customs? Ive read conflicting advice about no “camcorders” and having to register your phone upon arrival.

    • Meihoukai
      November 6 2018

      I definitely didn’t experience anything like that with my phone! No one gave any of my electronics a second glance — though oddly, when I flew from Cairo to Sharm El Sheikh, they gave me a REALLY hard time about my scuba regulator and made me check it! (I always carry it on, typically.)